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Earn your Degree in 18 Months!

The Human Services Program offers a B.S. in Human Services with two concentrations: Social Services and Counseling. The program is designed to enable both traditional and nontraditional students to earn their degrees. Adults with two years of transferable college credit can earn their degree in 18 months, attending classes twice a week.

  • Up to 35% of cost covered by program scholarships
  • Credit offered for life experience
  • Set tuition throughout the program
  • Classes of approximately 15 students
  • Mission Statement
  • Vision Statement
  • Delivery Model
  • Objectives
  • Program Director

The Human Services Program prepares students to offer social and clinical interventions that will help individuals and groups achieve their highest level of functioning, exhibit sensitivity to the cultural and ethnic roots of human behavior, and consistently demonstrate a commitment to maintaining good mental health. All Human Services faculty offer personal and academic support to students as they work toward assuming the responsibilities of public services within a framework of a commitment to social justice.

The Human Services Program strives to increase the number of well-qualified human service providers in Northwest Indiana, with particular attention to increasing the representation of minorities within the helping professions.

The Human Services program has the following features:

  • Program can be completed in as little as 12 months
  • Classes meet twice a week, four-hour classes, and two online classes
  • Cohort model formed of learning groups of approximately 15 students
  • Instructors are professionals in their field
  • Leads to a bachelor of science degree in Human Services
  • Credit offered for life experience

Upon completion of the Human Services Program, students will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that characterize the Human Service professional.

  • Origins and Theoretical Orientations of the Helping Professions: All students will be able to explain the origins of the human service profession and the value base of the profession, and to discuss issues that will impact its growth.
    • Theories and Techniques of Human Service Social and Clinical Interventions: All students will be able to identify and critically evaluate the major theories and techniques of social and clinical intervention and their relevance to the helping profession.
    • Systems Theory: All students will be able to use a range of theories to explain human systems: families, small groups, organizations, and social systems.
    • Social and Developmental Theory: All students will be able to use medical, social, and psychological models of human behavior to identify the conditions that promote and impede attainment of optimal human functioning.
  • Basic Integrated Technology Literacy: All students will demonstrate competencies in literacy and technical writing, methods of research and measurement, and computer literacy.
  • Knowledge of and Respect for Cultural Diversity: All students will demonstrate cultural sensitivity and multi-cultural awareness.
  • Proficiency in the Twelve Core Functions of a Counselor and The Eight Counseling Skill Groups.
  • Community Organizing and Public Policy Development: Social Service students will demonstrate proficiency in the skills of community organization, the development of social policy, and human service issues that are unique to urban environments.
  • Treatment Planning: All students will demonstrate proficiency in the strategies for planning and implementing social and clinical interventions.
  • Personal Growth and Commitment to Good Mental Health: All students will demonstrate a high level of personal self-awareness, an enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of social communication and an increased awareness of inevitable sources of interpersonal conflict. Students will have become more goal-oriented and strategic in their interactive behavior.
  • Working With Special Populations: Through completion of the various concentrations and specialties offered in the program, students will demonstrate effective intervention skills with special populations: the bereaved, the chemically dependent, children, etc.
  • Critical Thinking and Analytical Skills: All students will demonstrate the full range of competencies in critical thinking and higher order analysis necessary for the Human Services profession.
  • Professional Identity and Commitment to Life-Long Learning: Students will be able to articulate their identity as human service professionals and formulate a plan for ongoing professional development.
  • Ethical Competence: Students will be familiar with the Codes of Ethics of the major professional organizations that regulate the helping professions and demonstrate consistent growth in the ability to comply with these standards.
Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo, M.S.W.
Elizabeth Guzman-Arredondo, M.S.W.





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Program Requirements


  • B.S. Social Services
  • B.S. Counseling
  • B.S. Bereavement
  • B.S. Chemical Dependency
  • B.S. Self-Design Specialty
  • Courses

B.S. in Human Services with a Social Services Concentration (124 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • 56 hours: General Education

  • 18 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 200 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse
    HSV 210 Research Methods
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods OR HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
    HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    HSV 255 HIV/AIDS/STD's

  • 33 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Counseling
    HSV 317 Health Care and Social Services
    HSV 319 Case Management
    HSV 347 Social Services with Children
    HSV 358 Social Service and Public Policy
    HSV 360 Gerontological Social Services
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 413 Methods in Community Organizations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 495 Practicum

  • 17 hours: Electives
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Skills
    PSYC 341 Child Psychology
    PSYC 342 Psychology of Adolescence
    PSYC 343 Adult Development and Aging

B.S. in Human Services with a Counseling Concentration (125 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • 56 hours: General Education

  • 18 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 200 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods OR HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
    HSV 235 Statistics and Research Methods
    HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    HSV 255 HIV/AIDS/STD's

  • 27 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Counseling
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Skills
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum

  • 23 hours: Electives
    Elective Recommendations:

    PSYC 341 Child Psychology
    PSYC 342 Psychology of Adolescence
    PSYC 343 Adult Development and Aging

B.S. in Human Services with a Bereavement Concentration (125 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • 56 hours: General Education

  • 18 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 200 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse OR HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods OR HSV 235 Statistics and Research Methods
    HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    HSV 255 HIV/AIDS/STD's

  • 36 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Counseling
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Skills
    HSV 312 Death, Dying and Caregiving
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service
    HSV 355 Psychological Consequences of Dying
    HSV 357 Bereavement Counseling with Families
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum

  • 14 hours: Electives
    Elective Recommendations:

    PSYC 341 Child Psychology
    PSYC 342 Psychology of Adolescence
    PSYC 343 Adult Development and Aging

B.S. in Human Services with a Chemical Dependency Concentration (125 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • 56 hours: General Education

  • 21 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 200 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods OR HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
    HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    HSV 255 HIV/AIDS/STD's

  • 33 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Counseling
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Practice
    HSV 315 Compulsive and Addictive Behavior
    HSV 328 Counseling the Chemically Dependent
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum

  • 10 hours: Electives
    Elective Recommendations:

    PSYC 341 Child Psychology
    PSYC 342 Psychology of Adolescence
    PSYC 343 Adult Development and Aging

B.S. in Human Services with a Self-Designed Specialty Concentration (125 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • 56 hours: General Education

  • 18 hours: Requisites for the Major
    HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
    HSV 200 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Abuse OR HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
    HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods OR HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
    HSV 255 HIV/AIDS/STD's

  • 39 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    HSV 300 Family Counseling
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Skills
    HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Service Professionals
    HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
    HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
    HSV 420 Group Counseling
    HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
    HSV 495 Practicum
    PSYC 315 Personality Psychology
    HSV or PSYC ____ (upper level course only and approval of program director)
    HSV or PSYC ____ (upper level course only and approval of program director)
    HSV or PSYC ____ (upper level course only and approval of program director)

  • 11 hours: Electives
    Elective Recommendations:

    PSYC 341 Child Psychology
    PSYC 342 Psychology of Adolescence
    PSYC 343 Adult Development and Aging

Students who complete a counseling specialty will, upon request, be awarded a Certificate of Achievement by the Human Services program.

HSV 100 Introduction to Human Services
3 hours
Students will be provided with an overview of the Human Services field and the various concentrations offered at Calumet College of St. Joseph. This course serves as the foundational course for the Counseling and Social Service concentrations.

HSV 200 Introduction to Alcoholism and Drug Abuse
3 hours
Students are provided with an overview of alcoholism and drug abuse. The course surveys the various causation theories including the disease concept. The biological, psychological and spiritual implications of chemical dependency will be examined. Various counseling approaches will be surveyed as well as the influence of the self-help movement.

HSV 220 Human Services Models and Methods
3 hours
The student will be given an overview of the various treatment modalities used in the direct practice of social service delivery in both a social service and clinical context. These skills will focus on the management of the change process.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Services (HSV 100) or taken concurrently.

HSV 230 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances
3 hours
This course focuses upon the nature of psychoactive drugs, the effects they have on the body and mind of the user and the behaviors associated with their use and abuse. Drug interactions and withdrawal symptoms will be identified for each class of drugs. The relationship with pharmacology and the addictions counseling field will be emphasized. Delivered as a Hybrid course.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (HSV 200) or permission of Instructor.

HSV 235 Research Methods for Human Services
3 hours
This course will introduce students to a broad range of research methods essential for the professional human services provider. These will include: participant observation, survey design, interviewing skills, Internet and journal research, and empirical research design. Students will participate in a semester-long research project. Field opportunities designed to develop mastery of a variety of research techniques will be an important component of this course.

HSV 250 Human Service and Professional Issues
3 hours
This course surveys the standards of professional conduct and ethical codes for various associations and/or credentialing organizations. Organizations to be considered are the Indiana Counselors Association on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse counselors, American Psychological Association, American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, National Association of Social Workers, and the Health Professions Bureau (Indiana). The goal of this course is to provide the student with the necessary information to enable students to make informed decisions regarding appropriate behavior with clients and other professionals. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 255 HIV/ADS/STD's 3 hours
Today Human Service providers are confronted with clients who are high risk for contracting many diseases. In order to serve these clients, Human Service professionals need information that is up-to-date and can be readily used in educating their clients.

HSV 300 Family Counseling 3 hours
This course will explore the systems approach to family treatment using several theories of family therapy. Focus will be on the recognition of the rules, roles, and communication styles and coping mechanisms within different family systems. The use of various techniques including the genogram, sculpturing, and paradoxical interventions will also be studied.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Human Service (HSV 100); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305).

HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
3 hours
This course surveys theoretical foundations of major contemporary approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Students will learn the theory of personality and understanding of how to affect change characteristic of nine theories of personality and counseling. Students will be encouraged to begin the process of developing a personal style of counseling.

HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Practice
3 hours
This course introduces students to a short-term, problem solving model of counseling, instruction in each of the Twelve Core Functions of the counselor and an overview of the Eight Counselor Skill Groups.
Prerequisites: introductory level course for student's concentration in Human Services; Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305)

HSV 312 Death, Dying and Caregiving
3 hours
This course will offer an overview of the grief process and the common beliefs and myths about death and dying. This course will help students increase their awareness about the issues surrounding the death process and how grief impacts loved ones. Students will also have an opportunity to develop the ability to recognize situational grief reactions and secondary losses and explore effective helping interventions. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 315 Compulsive and Addictive Behaviors
3 hours
This course will examine the various addictions and compulsive behaviors the counselor might encounter as a treatment provider. Topics include but are not limited to, pathological gambling, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, sexual addiction, religious addiction, workaholism and co-dependency. These behaviors will be compared to and distinguished from the obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counseling Practice (HSV 200)

HSV 317 Healthcare and Social Services
3 hours
This course will provide the student with an overview of the healthcare field. It will examine patient assessment within the health care setting. Attention will be directed toward the implications of Managed Care, discharge planning and the resources available within the medical field.

HSV 319 Case Management
3 hours
This course will assist students in developing the skills associated with effective case management in a social service setting. Students will be required to complete a simulated case management project from initial screening to evaluation.

HSV 328 Counseling the Chemically Dependent
3 hours
This course surveys three aspects of chemically dependency; namely the biological, psychological and spiritual dimensions. The user and the family system will be studied. Practical counseling strategies will be explored. Special emphasis will be given to the Judeo-Christian resources available to pastoral counselors.
Prerequisites: Introduction to Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (HSV 200); Theoretical Base of Counseling (HSV 305), and Clinical Counseling Skills (HSV 310).

HSV 342 Counseling for Sexual and Domestic Violence
3 hours
This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of counseling individuals and families impacted by sexual and domestic violence. The psychological dimensions of rape, battering and other forms of sexual and domestic violence will be explored. Special attention will be given to treatment methods and the various roles of mental health counselors, pastoral counselors and criminal justice counselors in responding to offenders and victims.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice

HSV 347 Social Services with Children
3 hours
The student will develop a vital concern for children and their families through the exploration of services to children, the effects of early childbearing and the family, day care and child development programs, child abuse and neglect, foster care, adoption, and child advocacy. The student will learn how services to families and children interact with the larger social and political structures of American cultural values and their affects on social policies.
Prerequisite: Case Management (HSV 319)

HSV 350 Theological Skills for Human Services Professionals
3 hours
This course examines the philosophical, theological and clinical foundations of varied approaches to pastoral counseling and the framework for understanding pastoral counseling as a specialization within the mental health profession. Students will contract for and complete a field experience in an area of pastoral counseling of particular interest to him/her, i.e. bereavement, hospital chaplainry, parish ministry, pastoral counseling with the chemically dependent. (Formerly HSV 210) This course may be taken as a Religious Studies elective.

HSV 355 Psychological Consequences of Dying
3 hours
This course will focus on developing an understanding of the psychological and physical experiences of the dying person. The student will study the different responses among children and adults who are dying. Attention will also be given to the patient diagnosed with AIDS and the responses these patients receive from society. The student will learn how to respond appropriately to the dying patient. Prerequisite: Completion of the counseling core or permission of instructor. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 357 Bereavement Counseling with Families
3 hours
The student will learn to recognize the difference between complicated and simple grief reactions and the difference between a normal grief response and depression. The varied responses to the dying by children and adults as well as differences between males and female response will also be studied. Students will also explore the potential for the shifting of roles within the family. Finally, students will learn to recognize both the long term and short term reactions to grief. Prerequisite: Permission of the counseling core or permission of instructor. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 358 Social Service and Public Policy
3 hours
The arena in which social service is practiced today usually has its boundaries set by rules and budgets developed through public mandates and its policies set by society standards. The student will review the changing standards of our society and study the changes in social policy that are incorporated to meet public policy. Both historical and current information will develop an understanding of the interrelationship between social service and social policy as well as the conflicts that do develop. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 360 Gerontological Social Services
3 hours
Students receive an orientation to the field of social service concerned with the psychosocial treatment of the elderly. Review of the development and management of present and needed social services and programs for the aged population and for elderly individuals will be studied. Current population trends and their implications for both the social service profession and society at large will be studied through the use of demographic information, current contemporary literature, and historical data. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 400 Crisis Intervention
3 hours
Students will be introduced to the various crisis intervention theories and models and the application toward various crises such as but not limited to, natural disaster, suicide, homicide, and domestic violence.

HSV 405 Counseling Diverse Populations
3 hours
This course will explore the special needs clients may present to the counselor during the treatment process. Students will examine how different forms of abuse, drug of choice, age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity and culture must be considered in the treatment planning process. The aim is to assist the student in becoming more sensitive to the individualized needs of each client.

HSV 413 Methods in Community Organizations
3 hours
The organizer's role in various stages of the problem-solving process is explicated, and factors influencing successful and unsuccessful interventions are examined. Although emphasis is placed on practical problems confronting community planners and organizers today, historical perspectives are reviewed for their significance in understanding current theoretical principles and practices. Delivered as a Hybrid course.

HSV 420 Group Counseling
3 hours
This course will introduce students to: 1) the various theories of group counseling; 2) the stages of group development; 3) group dynamics; and 4) the various types of groups and the leadership roles they require.

HSV 430 Assessment and Treatment Planning
3 hours
This course concentrates on the various screening and assessment tools available to the counselor. Although diagnosing a client is reserved for Master and Doctoral level clinicians, students will gain a working knowledge of the DSM IV classifications and multi axial assessment to enable the student to participate in the clinical staffing process. Students will learn to develop individualized treatment plans. Participants will be permitted to focus upon the criteria and disorders commonly associated with the student's intended field of counseling.
Prerequisite: HSV 305 and 310

HSV 495 Practicum
3 hours
This course will place students in an appropriate agency, depending on their concentration, in which they will be exposed to the work of that agency in a supervised setting. The program director, or an assigned instructor, will coordinate the students' supervision by an experienced staff from the selected agency. This course may be repeated for up to a total of 6 hours. All students are required to complete a comprehensive exam as part of this course. The results of this exam do not influence the student's final grade. The results are used to assess the extent to which the student has mastered the objectives of the Human Services Program and assist in strengthening the Human Services curriculum. This exam will be coordinated by the program director in consultation with the faculty practicum supervisor.
Pre-requisite: Senior status and meeting with program director by November 1 for the spring term, March 1 for the summer term, and April 1 for the fall term.

HSV 496 Topics in Human Services
1-3 hours
This course will examine topics of special interest in the human service field. Courses in pastoral counseling, criminal justice counseling and other areas of special interest will be as needed.








Frequently Asked Questions



Public Safety Management, Organization Management and Human Services.
We generally expect that the student will have already completed the equivalent of approximately two years of academic transfer credit, have earned a grade of “C” or better in English composition at a transfer institution, and have attained an over all transfer GPA of at least 2.0/4.0.
Credits from regionally accredited colleges generally transfer. Many business colleges are accredited by the state but are not regionally accredited. Check with our admissions office to see if the school that you attended is regionally accredited.
Keep in mind that classes meet only twice a week for 3.5 – 4 hours per class.
This will vary according to the amount of transfer credit you have earned previous to your enrollment at CCSJ. In many cases you can finish your degree in 12 months.
Our registrar will review all transcripts. Generally courses from regionally accredited colleges will transfer no matter how old they are.
We know that occasionally life or work may get in the way. If you need to sit out a particular five week class you will be allowed to make it up later on, with another group.
Attendance at class is essential. If you miss more than one four hour class session you will be withdrawn from that particular class. That class must be made up prior to graduation.
As a rule of thumb you should plan to devote 10 hours of study time for each 4 hours of class time.
CCSJ is fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, North Central Association. This is the regional accreditation body for this part of the United States.





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Orlando Garcia
Orlando Garcia