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The Theology program at Calumet College of St. Joseph advances the critical and constructive study of the ideas, symbols, narratives, beliefs, and practices of religious traditions, with particular attention to the rich diversity of Catholic Christian theology.

The Theology program is designed to provide students with resources for the analysis of religion; for investigation of the sources, historical development and contemporary practice of particular religious traditions; for critical appropriation of personal faith and ethics; and for the sympathetic appreciation of the beliefs of others that are central in the formation of religious identity, while simultaneously developing a habit of thinking that is interdisciplinary, critical and analytical. Although these resources are drawn principally from the Roman Catholic tradition, attention is directed to other Christian traditions as well as Judaism, Islam and eastern religions.

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As an academic discipline within a Catholic university, the Theology program is committed to implementing the four essential characteristics of a Catholic university described in the Apostolic Constitution on Catholic Universities, Ex Corde Ecclesiae.

Since the objective of a Catholic university is to assure in an institutional manner a Christian presence in a university world that is confronting the great problems of society and culture, every Catholic university, as Catholic, must have the following essential characteristics:

  • A Christian inspiration not only of individuals but of the university community as such.
  • A continuing reflection in the light of the Catholic faith upon the growing treasury of human knowledge, to which it seeks to contribute by its own research.
  • Fidelity to the Christian message as it comes to us through the church.
  • An institutional commitment to the service of the people of God and of the human family in their pilgrimage to the transcendent goal thatgives meaning to life (para. 13).

Rooted in Tradition

Rooted in Roman Catholic tradition, the Theology program engages dialogue with diverse traditions and academic approaches to the study of theology. We strive to:

  • engage in genuine search for truth through conversation between faith and reason,
  • critically examine religious dimensions of human knowledge and experience with particular emphasis on theological inquiry,
  • explore how faith promotes justice,
  • support and challenge students to become authentically free human beings with an ability and desire to understand and serve our world—especially through constructive dialogue with its diverse religious and humanistic traditions, and
  • collaborate with each other as well as faculty from across the College in our teaching, research, and service for the common good.

From a captivating historical investigation into sacred Scripture to a life-changing study of the Moral Life; from a careful study of the Doctrine of God, to an enthusiastic exploration of Catholic Social Teaching; from a fascinating foray into Liturgy and Sacraments, to a meaningful pursuit into Christian spirituality, the Theology program at Calumet College of St. Joseph offers graduates a foundational yet critical understanding of Christian faith, seated in Catholic tradition, yet welcoming of students of all religious backgrounds and those without any religious background.

Graduates of our program learn to engage in interfaith and intercultural dialogue, and to work for positive social change in our community, based on a Christian vision of the dignity of the human person, reconciliation, peace, justice, and the flourishing of all creation.

Students in the Ministry concentration will also gain a range of knowledge and practical skills necessary for effective leadership in Church ministry. This concentration is designed with the National Certification Standards for Lay Ecclesial Ministers in the U.S. Catholic Church as a guiding framework, with the needs of our sister Christian communities in mind.

Graduates will be prepared to enter professional lay ministry positions in Catholic parishes, and with continuing education and formation will have the ability to become fully proficient Catechetical Leaders, Pastoral Associates, or Parish Life Coordinators. Graduates in our sister Christian communities will gain the training in Scripture, Theology, and ministerial skills needed to serve their communities effectively.

Students in the Systematics concentration will gain essential knowledge and skills needed to pursue deeper study of Theology at the graduate level, including research and writing skills, Philosophical studies, and proficiency in a classical language. Students in the Scripture concentration will be prepared to teach Theology in Catholic elementary and high schools.

Regardless of one’s major, minor, or concentration, students are strongly encouraged to participate in volunteer opportunities and internships with area agencies and non-profit organizations. These opportunities are coordinated through the Office of Campus Ministry. A wide variety of volunteer service and immersion opportunities enable religious studies majors to apply what they learn in the classroom in both the local community and globally.

All students will find opportunities to nourish their spiritual lives, their relationship with God, and their passion for justice in the world.

These objectives are framed with a high regard for the National Certification Standards for Lay Ecclesial Ministers, the needs of the Catholic Diocese of Gary and our sister Christian communities in the Region, the mission of the College, and the charism of the Missionaries of the Precious Blood as guiding ideals.

  • Appreciate, analyze, and apply an understanding of the dignity of human persons and communities as foundational to theological study and ministerial relationships.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth and coherence of Christian theological studies.
  • Apply moral principles and ethical guidelines from Catholic teaching to issues in ministry and contemporary life.
  • Create positive social change based on the relationship between faith and justice from a Catholic, ecumenical, inter-religious, and global perspective.

Learning Objective for the Ministry Concentration

  • Demonstrate a range of leadership, communication, and pastoral skills necessary to function effectively in ministry.

Learning Objectives for the Systematics Concentration

  • Know the key ideas and works of major thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition that provide the groundwork for systematic theologies.
  • Demonstrate the research, writing, and classical language skills necessary for successful study of Theology at the graduate level.

Learning Objectives for the Scripture Concentration

  • Know the condition of the sacred authors' times and cultures, the literary genres in use at those times, and the modes of feeling, speaking and thinking then current.
  • Interpret Scripture in a way that is intelligible to context and appropriate to the Christian tradition. Use Scripture as an essential source in pastoral ministry.

Intellectual Inquiry: The Theology program values the full diversity of intellectual inquiry and scholarly methods, and takes seriously all questions of ultimate concern and significance.

Dialogue: The theology program values our vibrant Roman Catholic heritage and intentionally seeks meaningful dialogue with our ecumenical and religiously diverse community.

Social Justice: The theology program values intellectual and theological inquiry that fosters, on the one hand, awareness of systematic injustice in the world, and, on the other hand, solidarity with victims of oppression and marginalization. This emerges from our religious identity as a Catholic college in the Precious Blood tradition.

We offer small, discussion-based and project-based courses, with true one-on-one faculty mentoring, and a disciplined yet supportive approach to your learning.


Rev. Kevin Scalf, C.PP.S.
Rev. Kevin Scalf, C.PP.S.

Theology and Humanities Chairperson / Religious Advisor to the President
Room 626
(219) 473-4351
kscalf@ccsj.edu

Rev. Kevin M. Scalf, C.PP.S., is a member of the Missionaries of the Precious Blood religious order. He currently serves as Theology and Humanities Chairperson at Calumet College of St. Joseph, Hammond, IN., in addition to his role as religious advisor to the president. Fr. Scalf holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Mount St. Joseph University, Cincinnati, OH., in Religious Studies, Philosophy, and Communication Arts. He completed a Master of Arts degree in Theology at Xavier University, Cincinnati, a Master of Arts in Biblical Studies at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary, Cincinnati, and a Master of Divinity degree at Catholic Theological Union, Chicago. Fr. Scalf has taught at several Catholic high schools, and was a member of the part-time religious studies faculties at the University of Dayton; a full-time member of the faculty and administration at St. Joseph’s College, Rensselaer, IN, and part-time faculty member at a graduate seminary in Tanzania, Africa. He has also served as parochial vicar for several parishes in Whiting, IN. Fr. Scalf has taught for many years in the Lay Ecclesial Ministry Program and Deacon Formation Program for the Diocese of Gary, Diocese of Lafayette, and Archdiocese of Chicago. Fr. Scalf currently serves as chaplain of Bishop Noll Institute, Hammond, IN. In 2015 he was appointed by His Holiness, Pope Francis, as one 800 priests throughout the world to be a “Missionary of Mercy” throughout the Jubilee Year of Mercy.



Joan Crist, Ph.D.
Joan Crist, Ph.D.

Professor
Room 513
(219) 473-4304
jcrist@ccsj.edu

Dr. Crist currently serves as Associate Professor of Theology. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, and Master of Arts and Doctorate of Philosophy from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. Her dissertation topic was a translation of and commentary on St. Bonaventure’s Conferences on the Seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit. She has also served as Director of Religious Education at St. Joseph Catholic parish in downtown Hammond, and a religious educator at St. John Bosco middle school, and in a volunteer capacity as coordinator of ecumenism and interreligious affairs for the Diocese of Gary. She helped to incorporate service-learning more fully into the Social Justice course, and oral examinations into the General Education Theology curriculum. Her interfaith and social justice involvements include the Northwest Indiana Interreligious Initiative for Peace in the Middle East, the Northwest Indiana Regional Planning Commission 2040 Implementation Committee, service project partnerships with Hammond Public Schools, the Interfaith Federation, the Downtown Hammond Council, and most recently a collaboration with FAITH CDC in Gary on the Legacy Foundation’s Neighborhood Spotlight development process. She holds a mandatum from His Excellency Dale Melczek.



Kevin Considine, Ph.D.
Kevin Considine, Ph.D.

Professor
(219) 473-4353
kconsidine@ccsj.edu

Dr. Considine is Assistant Professor of Theology at the College. He holds a Master of Arts degree from the Catholic Theological Union at Chicago and a Doctorate of Philosophy from Loyola University Chicago. Informed by his background as a Social Worker leading at-risk youth through the process of service-learning, he has pioneered the use of service-based learning strategies in the Social Justice course. Informed by his background as a musician, he also furthered the use of music, performing art, and studio art as dialogue partners for World Religions, Social Justice, and upper-level theology courses. In addition, he has over five years of experience in leading communal studies of Scripture through methods such as lectio divina and Inductive Study as well as participating and providing leadership in a Small Christian Community in Chicago whose members are affiliated with various Christian denominations and churches. His academic research focuses on Roman Catholic soteriology, intercultural hermeneutics, Korean-American anthropologies of han, and theologies of racialized suffering in the U.S. His recent book, Salvation for the Sinned-Against: ‘Han’ and Schillebeeckx in Intercultural Dialogue (Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2015) focuses upon these areas and his work has appeared in: Horizons: The Journal of the College Theology Society, Tijdschrift voor Theologie, New Theology Review, Black Theology: An International Journal, and U.S. Catholic. He holds a mandatum from His Excellency Dale Melczek.



Daniel Lowery, Ph. D.
Daniel Lowery, Ph. D.

President of the College & Professor
(219) 473-4333
dlowery@ccsj.edu

In 1975, Daniel Lowery was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree from Valparaiso University, where he majored in History and Philosophy. He graduated from Indiana University Northwest in May 1989 with a Masters of Science degree in Business Administration. Dr. Lowery received his Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2001. In 2014, he completed work on a Masters in Pastoral Studies degree at Catholic Theological Union.

In 1995, Dr. Lowery retired from the Social Security Administration after a 20 years career serving in the agency’s local, statewide, and regional offices. He then launched a second career in higher education, serving, first, at Indiana University Northwest for ten years in its Business School and in IUN’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

In January 2005, Dr. Lowery joined the faculty at Calumet College of St. Joseph where he holds the James L. Fattore Chair in Management. On May 22, 2006, Dr. Lowery transitioned to the position of Vice President of Academic Affairs at Calumet College, and in July 2011, he assumed the position of President.

Dr. Lowery was ordained as a permanent deacon in the Catholic Diocese of Gary in June 2013. He now serves in this capacity at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Crown Point.

From November 2001 until December 2006, Dr. Lowery served as the Executive Director of the Northwest Indiana Quality of Life Council, a nonprofit leadership organization chaired on a rotating basis by the presidents and chancellors of Northwest Indiana’s six colleges and universities. In this capacity, he focused extensively on a broad range of public policy issues pertaining to Lake, Porter, and LaPorte Counties. From 2006 until 2010, he pursued this same interest as the host of Lakeshore Focus, a weekly public affairs program produced by Lakeshore Public Television.

Over the years, Dr. Lowery has served as an officer or board member for a number of professional associations and nonprofit organizations, including Campagna Academy, Lake Area United Way, Catholic Charities, the Heartland Center, Ancilla Systems, Inc., One Region, and the Bridges of Care Initiative in East Chicago.

Dr. Lowery is well-published in his field has provided consultation services to numerous public, private, and nonprofit organizations.



Garin L. Cycholl, Ph.D.
Garin L. Cycholl, Ph.D.

Philosophy Professor

Garin L. Cycholl holds a doctorate from the University of Illinois, Chicago; a Master of Arts in Creative Writing-Fiction, from the University of Illinois, Chicago; a Master of Arts in Divinity from Yale University; and a bachelor of arts in Religious Studies, from the University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.

Dr. Cycholl has published six books, including Blue Mound to 161, Hostile Witness, and The Bonegatherer, where place is a central concern. Blue Mound to 161, for example, explores violence and displacement among coalminers and bootleggers in southern Illinois in the early twentieth century. His writing in fiction and drama also explores the shared personal and social fault lines in American experience. His recent work here includes a screenplay adaptation of Walker Percy’s novel, Lancelot.

Dr. Cycholl grew up in southern Illinois, before attending college in Miami, Florida. In 1992, he returned to Illinois and pastored First/Saron United Churches of Christ in Olney/Dundas, then moved to Chicago in 1997. Currently, he teaches in the humanities, including creative and professional writing workshops at the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago.



Elizabeth-Anne Stewart, Ph.D.
Elizabeth-Anne Stewart, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

Elizabeth-Anne Stewart earned a Ph.D. in Theology from the University of Malta, as well as a B.A. (Hons.) in English, and holds several other graduate degrees and professional certificates from British and American institutions: Certification in Life Coaching from the Center for Credentialing and Education (CCE); Dip. (TN) TESOL and Dip. CoT (TESOL), Eurolink, U.K.; a D. Min. in Poetry from the Graduate Theological Foundation, IN ; a certificate in Spiritual Direction from the Claret Center, Chicago; and an M.A. in English from DePaul University, Chicago.

Born in England and raised both in England and on the Mediterranean island of Malta, Elizabeth-Anne Stewart, PhD., guides others through her teaching, spiritual direction, life coaching and writings.

For many years, Dr. Stewart held a joint appointment with the Departments of Religious Studies and University Ministry at DePaul University, Chicago, IL; prior to that, she taught in their Department of English. Her work at DePaul included campus ministry and additional teaching commitments (the School for New Learning, Study Abroad and Women’s Studies); off campus, Dr. Stewart taught as an adjunct professor in the Graduate Religious Studies program at Mundelein College (now Loyola).

The author of many books and articles, Dr. Stewart offers retreats and workshops across the U.S. and internationally. From 1985-2005, she wrote the Sunday scripture reflections for Living Faith, a popular Catholic publication that is read across the globe; she now provides her own online monthly scripture service, Sunday BibleTalk, which is also based on Sunday’s liturgical readings.

Great Theology Quotes

“Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe. Saint Augustine,” Sermons, 43:1.

"For I do not seek to understand in order that I may believe, but I believe in order that I may understand." St. Anselm. Proslogion, Chapter One.

God is the beyond in the midst of life. Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

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Program Requirements


  • B.A. Ministry
  • B.A. Systematics
  • B.A. Scripture
  • Theology Minor
  • Philosophy Minor
  • Courses

B.A. in Theology with a Ministry Concentration (120 hours)

These requirements are framed on the goals of the National Certification Standards for Lay Ecclesial Ministers (LEM) in the U.S. Catholic community.

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • General Education Requirements: 54 + 3 credit hours

  • Sequenced Core Courses: 15 credit hours
    THEO 310 Introduction to the Old Testament
    THEO 320 Introduction to the New Testament
    THEO 370 Christology: the Person and Work of Jesus
    THEO 380 Doctrine of God: One and Triune
    THEO 390 History of Christianity

  • Additional Core Courses, not necessarily sequenced: 15 credit hours
    THEO 410 Intercultural Hermeneutics
    THEO 430 Christian Moral Theology
    THEO 440 Suffering and Salvation
    THEO 450 History of Christian Spirituality
    THEO 460 Action and Contemplation: Social Justice II

  • Concentration in Ministry: 33 credit hours
    BSMT 220 Intro to Management / Thought, Principles, and Practice
    BSMT 260 Organizational Behavior
    BSMT 261 Applied Management or EWPC/BSMT 350 Business Communications
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    HSV 310 Clinical Counseling Practice or HSV 312 Death, Dying, and Caregiving
    THEO 340 Christian Worship and Sacraments (required by LEM standards for parish ministry)
    THEO 470 Leadership in Parish Life (required by LEM standards for parish ministry)
    THEO 495, Practicum (6 hrs)
    6 hours electives

B.A. in Theology with a Systematics Concentration (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • General Education Requirements: 54 + 3 credit hours

  • Sequenced Core Courses: 15 credit hours
    THEO 310 Introduction to the Old Testament
    THEO 320 Introduction to the New Testament
    THEO 370 Christology: the Person and Work of Jesus
    THEO 380 Doctrine of God: One and Triune
    THEO 390 History of Christianity

  • Additional Core Courses, not necessarily sequenced: 15 credit hours
    THEO 410 Intercultural Hermeneutics
    THEO 430 Christian Moral Theology
    THEO 440 Suffering and Salvation
    THEO 450 History of Christian Spirituality
    THEO 460 Action and Contemplation: Social Justice II

  • Concentration in Systematics: 33 credit hours
    Philosophy Minor (12)
    THEO 140, 141 Latin I and II (6)
    THEO 497 Theological Research (3)
    12 hours electives

B.A. in Theology with a Scripture Concentration (120 hours)

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree

  • General Education Requirements: 54 + 3 credit hours

  • Sequenced Core Courses: 15 credit hours
    THEO 310 Introduction to the Old Testament
    THEO 320 Introduction to the New Testament
    THEO 370 Christology: the Person and Work of Jesus
    THEO 380 Doctrine of God: One and Triune
    THEO 390 History of Christianity

  • Additional Core Courses, not necessarily sequenced: 15 credit hours
    THEO 410 Intercultural Hermeneutics
    THEO 430 Christian Moral Theology
    THEO 440 Suffering and Salvation
    THEO 450 History of Christian Spirituality
    THEO 460 Action and Contemplation: Social Justice II

  • Concentration in Scriptural Studies for students aiming at a career in religious education: 33 credit hours
    THEO 350 Gospels
    THEO 496 Selected Topics in Theology (6 hrs)
    THEO 497 Theological Research
    HSV 305 Theoretical Bases of Counseling
    THEO 495, Practicum (6 hrs)
    12 hours electives

Minor in Theology (18 hours)

The Minor in Theology allows a student pursuing another degree at the College to explore the discipline beyond the requirements of the General Education program, by completing five courses from among the Sequenced and Additional Core courses. Student must take THEO 130 and THEO 131

Philosophy is the personal search for truth, meaning, and virtue. In the Philosophy minor, students will ask, and begin to formulate answers to, three fundamental philosophical questions: "Who am I? What is real? How should I live?" They will seek responses to these questions in conversation with their fellow students, with their instructors, and with the minds of the West's greatest thinkers.

In addition to our introductory course, Great Philosophical Ideas (PHIL 200), students minoring in Philosophy will take three courses focused on questions central to the history of Western Philosophy: metaphysics (What is real?); epistemology (How do we know?), and ethics (How do we live?). Together, these courses give students a firm foundation in the main disciplines of philosophy. An additional Topics course, in such subjects as global and contemporary philosophies, offers opportunities to explore readings and ideas not contained in the three core courses. In all courses, students will build critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills that will help them to prepare for graduate study and to enhance their majors.

The Philosophy minor is based on the Great Books approach to education, that universal human questions are best explored through classic texts. The core texts of the philosophy minor are: Plato's Five Dialogues, Euclid's Elements of Geometry, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologiae, Rene' Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, David Hume, Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, Immanuel Kant's Groundwork of a Metaphysic of Morals, John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism, Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, and Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism and Humanism. Students who take the minor will leave the college with a firm familiarity with these core texts, as well as other texts according to each instructor's discretion, and the ongoing discussions of program faculty.

In keeping with the Great Books approach, all the courses within the minor are framed around the Seminar method, which encourages maximum student engagement with the material. The Seminar begins with a question asked by the leader, and thereafter consists mostly of student discussion. Students talk with one another, not just to the leader. They do not raise their hands for permission to be heard, but enter the discussion or withdraw from it at will. The resulting informality is tempered by formal codes of conduct. Under these circumstances, the primary role of the instructor is not to give information, but to guide the discussion, to keep it moving, to raise objections and to help the students in every possible way to understand the author, the issues, and themselves. The aim is always to develop the students' powers of reason and understanding and to help them arrive at informed convictions of their own.

Minor in Philosophy (15 hours)

The following courses are required for a minor in Philosophy:

PHIL 200 Great Philosophical Ideas (included in General Education)
PHIL 321 What is Real? (Metaphysics)
PHIL 322 How Can I Know? (Epistemology)
PHIL 323 How Should I Live? (Ethics)
PHIL 375/BSMT 375 Business Ethics (also satisfies this requirement)
PHIL 496 Topics in Philosophy

All courses share a unique emphasis on primary sources, discussion, and oral communication, demonstrated in the use of oral examinations throughout the curriculum.

THEO 110 Social Justice
In this course, students explore and analyze social justice issues, and then suggest positive action for social change. The foundation is experiential service-learning in dialogue with Scripture, Catholic Social Teaching, and great thinkers of the twentieth century who engage religion and social justice. College-level skills are emphasized. The Signature oral exam and writing assignment are requirements of this course. This course must be taken in the student's first semester at the College.

THEO 130 Global Religions in Dialogue
In this course, students seek what is true and holy in the world’s great religious traditions through encounter with diverse faith communities, with critical and constructive reflection on their history, beliefs, morals, and ways of worship. These diverse traditions are brought into dialogue with Catholic theology and with the students’ own religious roots or philosophical views. A visit to a faith community is a requirement of this course. The Signature oral exam and writing assignment are requirements of this course.

THEO 131 Theological Foundations
In this course, students gain a broad overview of the academic study of Christian theology and its articulation within the Catholic tradition. Topics include the human search for meaning; human nature and human destiny; the nature of God; faith and reason; divine revelation; biblical interpretation; the person of Jesus Christ and the Trinity; worship; theology of Church; and sacramental spirituality for a post-modern world.

THEO 140 Latin I
In this course, beginning students learn foundational Latin pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, and translation skills.

THEO 141 Latin II
In this course, developing students apply essential knowledge of Latin grammar and vocabulary to reading and translating increasingly complex passages, including some primary sources.

THEO 310 Introduction to the Old Testament
For Christians, Sacred Scripture is the normative form of God’s Revelation and the foundation of theology. Through this course, students will gain familiarity with the canon of Scripture, and with the overall narrative of salvation history told in the first testament of the Bible, with attention to specific passages that form the bases for key Christian beliefs. They will apply a Catholic approach to understanding and interpreting Scripture, while appreciating the variety of interpretive methods that arise from various cultures and denominations, and raising theological questions concerning the meanings of Old Testament texts in their historical contexts and today.

THEO 320 Introduction to the New Testament
The New Testament, especially the Gospels, forms the original primary source of Christian belief and life. Through this course, students will gain familiarity with the canon and overall narrative of the New Testament, with emphasis on the life and teachings of Jesus, and specific passages that form the bases for key Christian doctrines and moral values. They will apply a Catholic approach to understanding and interpreting Scripture, while appreciating the variety of interpretive methods that arise from various cultures and denominations, and raising theological questions concerning the meanings of the texts in their historical contexts and today.

THEO 340 Christian Worship and Sacraments
Worship is the crucial meeting point between theology and the People of God whom the minister is called to serve. It is primarily through the Liturgy, especially the Mass and the celebration of the Sacraments, that the Catholic community as a whole encounters and discovers its faith. The lay minister, therefore, must be equipped to facilitate that encounter in the most effective ways possible. Through this course, students will integrate knowledge of liturgical history and sacramental theology into the practical skills involved with facilitating the worship life of a parish.

THEO 350 Gospels
The four canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) are the main sources for the Christian narrative about the life, death and Resurrection of Jesus. Students study the Gospels with attention to their historical, literary, cultural, and theological worlds in order to understand how each Gospel theologically portrays Jesus. The course helps students integrate study and interpretation of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church and world.

THEO 370 Christology: The Person and Work of Jesus
The person and work of Jesus are at the heart of Christian faith. In this course, students will seek to understand Jesus of Nazareth, a first-century Jewish charismatic figure, within his context, and then to assess the historical development of doctrine about Jesus from the New Testament to the Councils of Nicaea and Chalcedon, as the “Jesus movement” grew from a small Jewish sect to a global religion.

THEO 380 Doctrine of God, One and Triune
The task of theology is to speak of God, the ultimately incomprehensible mystery. In this course, students will seek to understand the uniquely Christian claim that God is One and Three, a Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Engaging in close readings of classic texts, they will assess the development of the Christian doctrine of God within its changing contexts, from the Council of Nicaea and the later Fathers to the great scholastic syntheses of the European Middle Ages, while exploring a variety of theological and philosophical questions about God.

THEO 390 History of Christianity
In this course, students will survey the two-thousand-year history of the Church, focusing primarily on key events in the life of the Church and society, and development in the Church’s structure and theological self-understanding. The modern period, from the close of the Middle Ages through Vatican II, will be emphasized, including such historical and ecclesial events as colonization, Reformation, the Enlightenment and its effects on religion, the industrial revolution and the beginnings of modern Catholic Social Teaching, the ecumenical movement, and the present expansion of the Church to a diverse global community concentrated in Africa and Latin America, reflected in the teachings of the Second Vatican Council.

THEO 410 Intercultural Hermeneutics
Through this course, students demonstrate embodied knowledge of ways for understanding “culture”, one’s own cultural situatedness and biases, and for positively navigating the cultures of “Others”. Students will understand the theological basis for a positive view of cultural difference in the Christian doctrines of the Incarnation and Creation. Students will discern ways to engage in empathic communication, across cultural boundaries. Students will articulate how intercultural communication is not only an important skill but a way of life.

THEO 430 Christian Moral Theology
In this course, students will examine both the process of moral reasoning and a range of contemporary moral issues using critical tools drawn from theological ethics. Drawing on Scripture, tradition, reason, and the contemporary situation, students will apply Christian ethical responses to such issues as sexuality, family life, medicine and health, the environment, business, and violence.

THEO 440 Suffering and Salvation
In this course, students will re-envision the meaning of salvation, the message at the heart of Jesus’ Gospel, not only as the individual experience of an afterlife, but also as the future God intends for this world, to focus on the healing of the victims of sin and oppression, but not omitting forgiveness and reconciliation for the sinners and oppressors.

THEO 450 History of Christian Spirituality
Theology must always be rooted in a deep experiential awareness of God. In this course, students explore the search for relationship with God in different periods and perspectives within the Christian spiritual tradition. Emphasis will be placed on Christian spirituality as a lived experience and an academic discipline. In addition to a general overview of the major movements, concerns, and personalities, classic texts, art, and/or music will be studied to examine experiences of conversion and spiritual growth, mysticism and prayer, community and compassion in both Catholic and Protestant traditions. Students will also consider how the search for sacred wisdom contributes to the life of the larger community, and helps with the work of healing a wounded world.

THEO 460 Social Justice II
In this course, students carry out a social justice project using the Integral Human Development model adopted by Catholic Relief Services and articulate a spirituality of endurance and resilience for the long term work of social change.

THEO 470 Leadership in Parish Life
The lay minister must exhibit a capacity for leadership and collaboration in all aspects of parish life. Through this course, students gain a range of lay ministry competencies not addressed in other courses, including: canon law; safe environment training; working with volunteers; choosing and implementing a catechetical program; incorporating technology in evangelization; record-keeping and budgets. Students may be required to seek additional competencies from other resources, such as CPR/First Aid training.

THEO 495 Practicum
In this course, students will be placed in an appropriate parish, faith community, school, or organization, depending on their concentration, in which they will be exposed to the work of that organization in a supervised setting. The program director, or an assigned instructor, will coordinate the students' supervision by an experienced staff member from the selected organization, and lead regular theological reflection sessions with students in the course. This course may be repeated for up to a total of 6 hours. All students are required to complete a comprehensive exam as part of this course. The results of this exam do not influence the student's final grade. The results are used to assess the extent to which the student has mastered the objectives of the Theology and Ministry Program and assist in strengthening the curriculum. This exam will be coordinated by the program director in consultation with the faculty practicum supervisor.

THEO 496 Selected Topics in Theology
This course will examine topics of special interest in the fields of Theology, Ministry, and Scripture, such as (but not limited to): Theological Anthropology; Theologies of Interreligious Dialogue; Theologies of Liberation, Feminism, and Ecology; Selected Great Thinkers; Black and Latino/a Theologies; Book of Revelations and Apocalyptic Literature; Prophets in the Hebrew Scriptures; Psalms, Proverbs, and Wisdom Literature, Women in the Bible; Theology of the Body; etc. Topics courses (but not specific topics) may be repeated for a total of 6 hours.

THEO 497 Capstone Research Paper
The Capstone is designed to help majors to extend their understanding of the meaning and methods of Theology and Scripture studies. It provides students with an opportunity to synthesize aspects of their course work and to identify key themes, questions, and areas in need of further study. This is done primarily through the writing of a research paper and a public defense.





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Carlos Moreno

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Jordan Thome

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Ellen Wilson