Course Descriptions


BIOL 115 Cell and Evolution
3 hours
A 3-credit hour class. Introduction to biological concepts, including origins of life, biochemical principles, energetics, cellular organization, mechanisms of heredity, and evolution. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisite is placement into MATH 103 or higher and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 115 Lab

BIOL 115L Cell and Evolution Lab
1 hour
A 1 credit hour course implementing through experiments the biological concepts, including origins of life, biochemical principles, energetics, cellular organization, mechanisms of heredity, and evolution. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisites: placement into MATH 103 or higher and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 115.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 205. Plants, Animals and the Ecosystem
3 hours
A 3 credit hour course. Introduction to biological concepts, including classification and levels of organization, organismal biology including surveys of plant biology and zoology, ecology and conservation biology. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 205L

BIOL 205L. Plants, Animals and the Ecosystem Lab
1 hours
A 1 credit hour course. A lab which will allows for hands on experiential learning to biological concepts, including classification and levels of organization, organismal biology including surveys of plant biology and zoology, ecology and conservation biology. Students will explore unifying concepts in biological science while developing key investigative skills necessary for scientific exploration and hypothesis testing. Includes laboratory.
Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 205.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 215. Medical Terminology
2 hours
A 2-credit course. Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed.
Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L.

BIOL 230. Microbiology
3 hours
A 3-credit course. BIOL 230 is where emphasis is placed on ultrastructure, genetics, molecular biology, physiology and metabolism of microorganisms; role of microorganisms in food, water, agriculture, biotechnology, infectious diseases, and immunology.
Prerequisites: C or better in, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 230L.

BIOL 230L. Microbiology Lab
1 hours
A 1-credit course. BIOL 230L is a laboratory experience with pure cultures and sterile techniques; methods of identification of unknown microorganisms; experiments demonstrating principles of microbial genetics, transformation, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance.
Prerequisites: C or better in, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 230.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 300. Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3 hours
A 3-credit course. BIOL 300 is the first in the sequence where the students are reviewed in basic concepts of biology, biochemistry (cell theory, cell structure, cell metabolism, and cell reproduction) before proceeding to a detailed study of the normal histology, gross anatomy, and physiology of each body system within the human organism. Emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease along with the central nervous system. The focus also includes looking at the structure and function of the human body, and of underlying biological principles.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L or consent of the program director and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 300L.

BIOL 300L. Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1 hour
A 1-credit course. BIOL 300L is the lab in which students will reinforce their learning of the normal histology, gross anatomy, and physiology of each body system within the human organism. Emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease along with the central nervous system. The focus also includes looking at the structure and function of the human body, and of underlying biological principles. The structure and function of mammalian cells and tissues and the human skeletal, muscular and nervous systems are discussed. The integration of the functions of the various systems is also emphasized.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L or consent of the program director and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 300.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 305. Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3 hours
A 3-credit course. BIOL 305 is the second course in the sequence where the students review the basic concepts of biology biochemistry (cell theory, cell structure, cell metabolism, and cell reproduction) before proceeding to a detailed study of the normal histology, gross anatomy, and physiology of each body system within the human organism. Emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease along with the central nervous system. The structure and function of mammalian cells and tissues and the human skeletal, muscular and nervous systems are discussed. The integration of the functions of the various systems is also emphasized.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, and BIOL 300L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 305L.

BIOL 305L. Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1 hour
A 1-credit course. BIOL 305L is the second lab course in the sequence where the students review the basic concepts of biology biochemistry (cell theory, cell structure, cell metabolism, and cell reproduction) before proceeding to a detailed study of the normal histology, gross anatomy, and physiology of each body system within the human organism by hands on experiential learning labs. Emphasis is placed on homeostatic mechanisms as they relate to health and disease along with the central nervous system. The structure and function of mammalian cells and tissues and the human skeletal, muscular and nervous systems are discussed. The integration of the functions of the various systems is also emphasized.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, and BIOL 300L and concurrent enrollment in BIOL 305.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 315. Mendelian and Molecular Genetics
3 hours
BIOL 315 is a course which focuses on the principle of heredity and variation in phage, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. Basic molecular genetics, gene regulation, recombination, DNA replication, transcription and translation.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L and concurrently enrolled in BIOL 315L.

BIOL 315L. Mendelian and Molecular Genetics Lab
1 hour
BIOL 315L is a lab course that focuses on experiments and demonstrations of classical and molecular genetics using material from Drosophilia, corn, rodents, bacteria, fungi and viruses.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L and concurrently enrolled in BIOL 315.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

BIOL 360. Principles of Immunology
3 hours
BIOL 360 is an introduction to experimental and theoretical foundations of immunology. The course focuses on concepts, landmark experiments and recent advances. Topics include innate and adaptive immunity; structure/function of antibody molecules and T cell receptors; regulation of immune responses through cellular interactions. Applications of concepts to medically significant issues (vaccines, transplantation, inflammation, autoimmunity, cancer, HIV/AIDS) are discussed. Interpretative analysis of experimental data is emphasized.
Prerequisites: Placement into MATH 103 or higher, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L.

BIOL 372. Biomedical Health Research Literacy I
3 hours
A 3-credit course. This course is the first part of a two semester research and literature course which will cover the understanding of how to read, interpret, and analyze the latest topics in the biomedical/health field. The students will prepare papers in a similar manner as preparing for publication in a peer reviewed journal. In particular, this course will give students insight through exciting "hands-on" projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bio-informatics. Students investigate the various health conditions including various Prions diseases, Lou Gehrig’s disease and others, just to name a few. A theme through the course is to develop a cure/treatment for various diseases. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments and research related discoveries that might have prolonged the person's life. Key biological concepts including: metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, neurological impacts, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including: the design process, feedback loops, spectral interpretation, and the relationship of structure to function are incorporated in the curriculum where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of the Biomedical Science field and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in industry/advanced applied sciences.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and concurrently enrolled in CHEM 310, and CHEM 310L or consent of the program director.
Course may be repeated if desired.
Lab fees will be applicable.

BIOL 373. Biomedical Health Research Literacy II
3 hours
A 3-credit course. This course is the second part of a two semester research and literature course in biomedicine which will cover the how to put together a proper proposal by interpreting, analyzing, and presenting data acquired in the first sequence. The students will prepare papers in a similar manner as preparing for publication in a peer reviewed journal. In particular, this course will give students insight through exciting "hands-on" projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bio-informatics. Students investigate the various health conditions including various Prions diseases, Lou Gehrig’s disease and others, just to name a few. A theme through the course is to develop a cure/treatment for various diseases. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments and research related discoveries that might have prolonged the person's life. Key biological concepts including: metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, neurological impacts, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including: the design process, feedback loops, spectral interpretation, and the relationship of structure to function are incorporated in the curriculum where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of the Biomedical Science field and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in industry/advanced applied sciences.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, and CHEM 310L, and BIOL 372 or consent of the program director.
Course may be repeated if desired.
Lab fee is applicable.

BIOL 497. Research
1-3 hours
By participating in a semester long research program, students can earn credit toward their degree. See Science Program Director for details. Three hours of research activities are required each week for each credit hour enrolled.



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CHEM 143. Nutrition I
3 hours
In this course, an introduction of the chemical nature of foods to both science and non-science majors will occur. Students will be encouraged to investigate substances, which supply nutrients to the human body, and the effects of these nutrients in health and disease. The students will be able to calculate their nutritional intakes and evaluate their own nutritional state by comparison to the recommended daily values. The course will also focus on the exploration of the chemical molecules which supply nutrients for living organisms.
Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 104 or higher, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 143L, or consent of the program director.

CHEM 143L. Nutrition lab
1 hour
A 1-credit hour course implementing through experiments the nutritional effects which will investigate substances that supply nutrients to the human body, and the effects of these nutrients in health and disease. The students will be able to calculate their nutritional intakes and evaluate their own nutritional state by comparison to the recommended daily values. The laboratory is an exploration of the chemical molecules which supply nutrients for living organisms and brings hands on experience in the behavior of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.
Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 104 or higher, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 143, or consent of the program director.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 200. General and Analytical Chemistry I
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course implementing the general and analytical topics including stoichiometry, periodicity, reaction types, the gaseous state, solution stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acidbase equilibria, dissolution-precipitation equilibria.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 104 or higher and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 200L.

CHEM 200L. General and Analytical Chemistry I lab
1 hour
A 1-credit hour course implementing through experiments the general and analytical topics including stoichiometry, periodicity, reaction types, the gaseous state, solution stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, dissolution-precipitation equilibria.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisite: Placement into MATH 104 or higher and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 200.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 205. General and Analytical Chemistry II
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course implementing topics in general chemistry and analytical chemistry which will cover such topics as phase transitions, thermochemistry, spontaneity/equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetics, bonding, order/symmetry in condensed phases, coordination compounds, descriptive chemistry.
Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200 and 200L and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 205L.

CHEM 205L. General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab
1 hour
A 1-credit hour course implementing topics in general chemistry and analytical chemistry through experiential learning and labs which will cover such topics as phase transitions, thermochemistry, spontaneity/equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetics, bonding, order/symmetry in condensed phases, coordination compounds, descriptive chemistry.
Prerequisite: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200 and 200L and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 205.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 310. Organic Chemistry I
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course implementing the structure and function of organic molecules; acids and bases; functional groups; thermodynamics and kinetics of organic reactions; alkanes; stereochemistry; alkyl halides and nucleophilic substitution; elimination reactions; alcohols, ethers and epoxides; alkenes; alkynes; oxidation and reduction.
Prerequisites: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 310L.

CHEM 310L. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
1 hour
A 1-credit hour lab implementing basic organic techniques (distillation, crystallization), reactions (esterification, oxidation, addition, substitution, elimination), instruments (gas, IR, UV/Vis).
Prerequisites: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 310.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 311. Organic Chemistry II
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course implementing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, alkenes, alkynes, alkanes, conjugated, and aromatic compounds.
Prerequisites: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 311L.

CHEM 311L. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
1 hour
A 1-credit hour lab implementing the analysis of organic structure determination through the interpretation of spectral information.
Prerequisites: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 311.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule

CHEM 320. Biochemistry
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course implementing the structure and function of cellular constituents; enzymology; metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleotides; molecular biology of biosynthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.
Prerequisites: C or better in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 320L.

CHEM 320L. Biochemistry Laboratory
1 hour
A 1-credit hour lab implementing through experiments various biochemical techniques via various instrumentation.
Prerequisites: C in Math 104 or placed in a higher math course, C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 320.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule

CHEM 430. Instrumentation Analysis
3 hours
This course is designed to give the students a broad experience in the theory of instrumentations. The labs will be investigative in nature where students are required to use the Internet and the Chemical literature to explore practical ways of using instruments for solving chemical problems qualitatively and quantitatively. The students will survey the theory and application of instruments such as: visible, ultra violet, Infra-red, Fluorescence, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Atomic absorption, Chromatography, and Mass Spectrometry.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and a minimum of MATH 104. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 430L.

CHEM 430L. Instrumentation Analysis Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Instrumentation Analysis. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and a minimum of MATH 104. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 430.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 445. Physical Chemistry I
3 hours
This course covers topics such as the thermodynamics of gases, solutions, reaction equilibria, and phase transitions.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, MATH 230 and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 445L.

CHEM 445L. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory portion of physical chemistry which focuses on experiments demonstrating principles of thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, spectroscopy, and quantum mechanics in chemical systems using modern instrumentation and methods of data analysis.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, MATH 230 and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 445.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

CHEM 446. Physical Chemistry II
3 hours
This course covers topics such as the kinetic and molecular theory of gases, introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics with application to model systems, multi-electron atoms, diatomic molecules and bonding.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, CHEM 445, CHEM 445L, MATH 230 and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 446L.

CHEM 446L. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory
1 hour
This course covers topics such as the kinetic and molecular theory of gases, introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics with application to model systems, multi-electron atoms, diatomic molecules and bonding.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, CHEM 310, CHEM 310, CHEM 311, CHEM311L, CHEM 445, CHEM 445L, MATH 230 and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 446.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.



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EXSS 200. Certified Personal Trainer
2 hours
This course will prepare students in the processes, theories and application of being a personal trainer. This course will provide the content necessary for students to sit for the national certification exam.

EXSS 215. Survey of Physical Education Health
3 hours
This course will provide an overview of all facets of sports including management, career opportunities, marketing and promotion, public relations fund raising, and event and facilities management. Several factors combine to make sports administration a growing and important area of study. The need for qualified administrators in the field increases rapidly.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L.

EXSS 400. Principles of Conditioning
3 hours
Lecture, discussion and laboratory course introducing athletic training and kinesiology students to basic procedures and philosophies of athletic training. Students gain knowledge of the basic science relationship to the prevention and care of, and recovery from athletic injuries. Students will begin practicing fundamental skills and orient themselves to the athletic training and coaching settings.

EXSS 410. First Responder
2 hours
This course prepares students to attain their certification in CPR and other life-saving interventions.

EXSS 415. Fitness Assessment
3 hours
Designed to give the student a foundation in the process of assessment (tests and measurement). The course includes the development of objectives/ outcomes, test construction, use of formative and summative evaluation, norm and criterion referenced measures, elementary statistics and the use of other evaluative materials specific to health and kinesiology.

EXSS 420. Techniques & Practices of Strength and Conditioning
1 hour
Building on the concepts presented in EXSS 400, students will be provided with the opportunity to practice the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of strength and conditioning professional. Topics covered will include information on organization and administration of facilities, testing and evaluation, exercise techniques, training adaptations, and periodized program design for all athletes.
Prerequisites: C or better in EXSS 200, EXSS 425, and concurrently taking EXSS 400.
This would not be recommended for students who are not majoring in kinesiology or minoring in EXSS.

EXSS 425. Techniques & Practices of Exercise Instruction
1 hour
This course covers the ability to develop and implement effective exercise training plans for personal fitness or use with future personal training clients. Through hands-on instruction and practice, students will create programs designed to improve and maintain health-related components of fitness and performance.
Prerequisites: C or better in EXSS 200 or concurrently enrolled in EXSS 200.

EXSS 435. Kinesiology
3 hours
A neuropsychological study of movement that integrates the central and peripheral nervous system mechanisms with those of the muscular system. These principles are applied to promoting the enhancement of skill acquisition and human performance. Dysfunctions affecting neuromuscular function are also studied.
Prerequisites: C or better in, BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L and concurrent enrollment in EXSS 435L.

EXSS 435L. Kinesiology Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Kinesiology. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: C or better in, BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L and concurrent enrollment in EXSS 435.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

EXSS 496. Special Topics
3 hours
This course will investigate, analyze and discuss significant and contemporary topics in the field of exercise sports and science.
Prerequisites: C or better in, BIOL 115 and BIOL 115L.



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FRSC 200. Forensic Science 1
3 hours
This course introduces forensic science, with emphasis on topics such as fingerprinting, hair analysis, blood typing, DNA testing, toxicology, and various analytical methods. It discusses the significance of results obtained via chemical, biological, trace, and pattern evidence.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103 (or placed in a higher math course), C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, and BIOL 205L, and concurrently enrollment in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, and FRSC 200L.

FRSC 200L. Forensic Science 1 Laboratory
1 hour
This course is the laboratory component for Forensic Science Survey. It will provide students with an opportunity to perform the experiments necessary to support the issues and topics discussed in the course.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103 (or placed in a higher math course), C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L and concurrently enrolled in CHEM 200, CHEM 200L and FRSC 200.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

FRSC 205. Forensic Science 2
3 hours
Forensic Science 2 is the second component of the forensic science sequence which develops the reasoning strategies through examination of case studies; solving real-world problems as part of an investigative team.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103 (or placed in a higher math course), C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L and concurrently enrolled in CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and FRSC 205L.

FRSC 205L. Forensic Science 2 Laboratory
1 hour
Forensic Science 2 is the lab component of the forensic science sequence where the examination of case studies; solving real-world problems as part of an investigative team is implemented.
Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 103 (or placed in a higher math course), C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L and concurrently enrolled in CHEM 205, CHEM 205L, and FRSC 205.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

FRSC 320. Biotechnology 1
3 hours
Biotech 1 is designed to illustrate the uses of biotechnology advances and techniques as applied to the broad fields of medicine and forensics. Techniques include: DNA fingerprinting, genetic testing, gene therapy and genetically modified organisms.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L, FRSC 205, FRSC 205L, along with concurrent enrollment in FRSC 320L.

FRSC 320L. Biotechnology 1 Laboratory
1 hours
Biotech 1 Lab is the laboratory which is designed to showcase with a hands-on experience the uses of biotechnology advances and techniques as applied to the broad fields of medicine and forensics. Techniques include: DNA fingerprinting, genetic testing, gene therapy and genetically modified organisms.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L, FRSC 205, FRSC 205L, along with concurrent enrollment in FRSC 320.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

FRSC 325 Biotechnology 2
3 hours
Biotechnology 2 is the second sequence of biotechnology where the techniques acquired from Biotechnology 1 are applied towards techniques such as bodily fluid analysis, blood typing, DNA fingerprinting, and paternal testing.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L, FRSC 205, FRSC 205L, FRSC 320, FRSC 320L along with concurrent enrollment in FRSC 325L.

FRSC 325L Biotechnology 2 Laboratory
1 hours
Biotechnology 2 Laboratory is the lab component of the second sequence of biotechnology where the techniques acquired from Biotechnology 1 are applied towards techniques such as bodily fluid analysis, blood typing, DNA fingerprinting, and paternal testing.
Prerequisites: C or better in BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 205, BIOL 205L, CHEM 200, and CHEM 200L, FRSC 200, FRSC 200L, FRSC 205, FRSC 205L, FRSC 320, FRSC 320L along with concurrent enrollment in FRSC 325.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.



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GEOL 110. Earth and Space Science
3 hours
Earth and Space Science is a course focusing on the study of the Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and its celestial environment. Students enrolled in this course analyze and describe Earth’s interconnected systems and how they are changing due to natural processes and human influence.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in GEOL 110L.

GEOL 110L Earth and Space Science Lab
1 hours
Earth and Space Science lab allows for hands on experience and theories explained through demonstrations focusing on the study of the Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and its celestial environment. Students enrolled in this course analyze and describe Earth’s interconnected systems and how they are changing due to natural processes and human influence.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in GEOL 110.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.



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BIKI 110. Introduction to Biokinetics and Exercise Science
3 hours
A 3-credit hour class that involves testing, designing, and implementing a personal physical fitness program. Emphasis is on developing and implementing personal fitness programs that include cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. We will also examine the exercise science profession, including the objectives structure, history, philosophy, and biological aspects of physical education and their field applications.
Prerequisite: Must be a Kinesiology major.

BIKI 210. Exercise Psychology and Behavioral Physical Activity
3 hours
A 3-credit hour course designed to provide students with theoretical knowledge related to exercise behavior change strategies and factors that influence physical activity participation and adherence. Topics to be covered include: (a) psychological theories for understanding and predicting health-oriented exercise behavior; (b) psychological and psychobiological responses to exercise; (c) psychological interventions for increasing exercise participation and adherence.
Prerequisite: C or better in PSYC 100.

BIKI 300. Exercises Physiology
3 hours
A 3-credit hour class that involves gaining an understanding of system physiology and the effects of physical activity on the human body. Cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal function, energetics and training for human performance will be the areas of focus in this class.
Prerequisite C or better in BIKI 110, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, BIOL 300L, CHEM 143, CHEM 143L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, EXSS 410, EXSS 435, and EXSS 435L.
Must also be concurrently enrollment in BIOL305 and BIOL 305L.

BIKI 305. Exercises Physiology II
3 hours
A 3-credit hour designed to focus within the fields of the latest medical and exercise science. There is a great emphasis on how nutritional variables affect exercise, training, and human performance. This course integrates advanced principles of nutrition and exercise to provide students with knowledge of nutritional methods for improving fitness and performance. This course presents cutting-edge nutritional concepts tailored for application by clients in a fitness setting or athletes in any sport.
Prerequisite C or better in BIKI 110, BIKI 300, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, BIOL 300L, CHEM 143, CHEM 143L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, EXSS 410, EXSS 435, and EXSS 435L.

BIKI 343. Applied Nutrition
3 hours
This course is designed to focus within the fields of the latest medical and exercise science. There is a great emphasis on how nutritional variables affect exercise, training, and human performance. This course integrates advanced principles of nutrition and exercise to provide students with knowledge of nutritional methods for improving fitness and performance. This course presents cutting-edge nutritional concepts tailored for application by clients in a fitness setting or athletes in any sport.
Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 143, CHEM 143L, MATH 104 or higher.

BIKI 360. Psychomotor Development and Movement
3 hours
A 3-credit hour class that examines the fundamental principles of motor development/motor learning and the integration of movement activities in the learning environment for children and adults.
Prerequisite: C or better in BIKI 110, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, BIOL 300L, BIOL 305, BIOL 305L, CHEM 143, CHEM 143L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, EXSS 410, EXSS 435, and EXSS 435L.

BIKI 365. Care and Prevention of Injury and Illness
3 hours
A 3-credit hour class that Introduces students to athletic training/biokinetics as a career as well as making them proficient in recognizing common sport injuries and how those injuries are treated.
Prerequisite: C or better in BIKI 110, BIOL 115, BIOL 115L, BIOL 300, BIOL 300L, BIOL 305, BIOL 305L, CHEM 143, CHEM 143L, CHEM 200, CHEM 200L, EXSS 410, EXSS 435, and EXSS 435L.



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MATH 095. Developmental Mathematics
3 hours
The student will study fundamental operations and properties of whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers, including decimals, ratios, percent, proportions, and exponents.
Credit not applicable toward a degree.

MATH 097. Beginning Algebra
3 hours
This course introduces students to fundamental algebraic concepts in preparation for Intermediate Algebra. Topics include operations with real numbers, variables, polynomials, factoring, linear equations and inequalities, and graphing.
Credit not applicable toward a degree.

MATH 103. Intermediate Algebra
3 hours
This course treats algebraic expressions, exponents, polynomials, graphing, inequalities, absolute value, linear and quadratic expressions, and systems of equations, applications, rational expressions, and logarithms.
Prerequisite: MATH 097 with a grade of C or better, or an appropriate Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 104. Algebra and Trigonometry
3 hours
This course is designed to prepare students for the standard calculus sequence. Topics include polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, and the laws of sines and cosines.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Mathematics.)
Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 110. Finite Mathematics
3 hours
Topics include applied systems of linear systems, matrices, modeling, regression and curvefitting, and linear programming. Application of technology to the solution of problems is stressed.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Mathematics.)
Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 115. College Geometry
3 hours
This course treats the fundamental concepts of Euclidean geometry from a modern point of view. Its topics include set, points, lines, space, betweeness, incidence, congruence, parallelism, similarity, transformations, volumes, and areas. Non-Euclidean geometries are introduced.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 148. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
3 hours
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence for elementary teachers covering the fundamental ideas and theories of mathematics beginning with arithmetic. Topics include problem solving, sets, whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical reasoning and precision of language are emphasized. Although various perspectives and approaches are taken for individual topics, this content course is not a methods course in the teaching of mathematics.
Prerequisite: MATH 097 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 149. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II
3 hours
This course is a continuation of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. It is the second course in a two-semester sequence for elementary teachers covering the fundamental ideas and theories of mathematics beginning with arithmetic. Topics include geometry, probability, statistics, and measurement. Mathematical reasoning and precision of language are emphasized. Although various perspectives and approaches are taken for individual topics, this content course is not a methods course in the teaching of mathematics.
Prerequisite: MATH 148

MATH 171. Principles of Statistics
3 hours
This course treats the gathering and interpretation of statistical data presented in various forms. Topics include the graphical and numerical representation of data, probability, sampling, statistical inference, correlation, and regression.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Mathematics.)
Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 201. Analytic Geometry
3 hours
This course explores coordinate geometry of two and three dimensions, conic sections, families of equations, graphing families of equations, isometries of the plane, polar coordinates, cylindrical coordinates, and spherical coordinates.
Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 220. Brief Survey of Calculus
3 hours
This course introduces the concepts of differential and integral calculus. Topics include functions, graphs, and limits, the derivative and applications; integration and applications.
Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 230. Calculus I
4 hours
This course is the standard first-semester college Calculus course. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, integration and its applications. Students will study the antiderivative of elementary functions and the applications of the definite integral in geometry, science, and business.
Prerequisites: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent Accuplacer exam score.

MATH 231. Calculus II
4 hours
This is the standard second-semester college Calculus course. Topics include differential equations, parametric equations, infinite sequences and series, and vectors and geometry of space. Students will study the applications of the afore-mentioned topics in geometry, science, and business.
Prerequisites: MATH 230 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 300. Linear Algebra
3 hours
This is the standard college Linear Algebra course. Topics will include linear equations in linear algebra, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, orthogonality and least squares, and symmetric matrices and quadratic forms. Students will study the applications of the afore-mentioned topics in geometry, science, and business.
Prerequisites: MATH 231 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 310. Calculus III
4 hours
This is the standard third-semester college Multivariate Calculus course. Topics include partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector calculus, and second order differential equations. Students will study the applications of the afore-mentioned topics in geometry, science, and business.
Prerequisites: MATH 231 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 315. Elements of Statistical Inference
3 hours
This is the standard college second semester statistics course. Topics include hypothesis testing, testing the difference between two means, two proportions, and two variances, correlation and regressions, other chi square tests, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics, and sampling and simulation. Students will study the applications of the afore-mentioned topics in science and business applications.
Prerequisites: MATH 171 with a grade of C or better and MATH 231 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 330. Differential Equations
3 hours
This is the standard college differential equations course. Topics include the derivation of equations of mathematical physics, biology, chemistry and other science courses, ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, simple vector field theory, theory of series, Fourier series, applications to partial differential equations, integration theorems, Laplace and Fourier transforms, and applications.
Prerequisites: MATH 310 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 360. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics
3 hours
This is the standard college introduction to abstract mathematics course. Topics include the structures and strategies of proofs in a variety of mathematical settings: logic, sets, combinatorics, relations and functions, and abstract algebra. This course is preparation for 400 level math courses and graduate school.
Prerequisites: MATH 231 with a grade of C or better.



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PHYS 300. Physics I
3 hours
A 3-credit hour calculus based physics course implementing kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws of motion; linear momentum, impulse collisions; work and kinetic energy; potential energy, conservation of energy; rotational kinematics and energy; rotational dynamics, static equilibrium; simple harmonic motion.
Prerequisites: Concurrently enrolled in MATH 230 (or placed in a higher math course) and concurrently enrolled in PHYS 300L.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 300L. Physics I Laboratory
1 hour
A 1-credit hour calculus based physics lab course implementing through various experiments the concepts of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws of motion; linear momentum, impulse collisions; work and kinetic energy; potential energy, conservation of energy; rotational kinematics and energy; rotational dynamics, static equilibrium; simple harmonic motion.
Prerequisite: Concurrently enrolled in MATH 230 (or placed in a higher math course) and concurrently enrolled in PHYS 300.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.

PHYS 305. Physics II
3 hours
A 3-credit hour calculus based physics course implementing electrostatics; electric currents; d-c circuits; magnetic fields; magnetic media; electromagnetic induction; a-c circuits; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves; reflection and refraction; interference.
Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 230 and concurrently enrolled in MATH 231 (or consent of the program director) and C or better in PHYS 300 and PHYS 300L while concurrently enrolled in PHYS 305L.

PHYS 305L. Physics II Laboratory
1 hour
A 1-credit hour calculus based physics lab course implementing through experiments the concepts of electrostatics; electric currents; d-c circuits; magnetic fields; magnetic media; electromagnetic induction; a-c circuits; Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves; reflection and refraction; interference.
Prerequisite is a C or better in MATH 230 and concurrently enrolled in MATH 231 (or consent of the program director) and C or better in PHYS 300 and PHYS 300L while concurrently enrolled in PHYS 305.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.



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SCIE 102. General Science
3 hours
A 3-credit course. The course discusses the developments over the past four centuries in the areas of physics, chemistry, earth science, and space science, by some of the brightest minds on the planet. The concepts are often greatly simplified for the purpose of an introductory survey course, but understanding them will still require mental effort, flexibility, and preparation. In essence, our current civilization is so dependent on these physical sciences that their contribution has fallen into “the background” and is often taken for granted. This course will teach the student how to use theory to problem-solve and “think like a physical scientist” (e.g. quantitative reasoning and analysis).
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisites: Must be concurrently enrolled in SCIE 102L.

SCIE 102L. General Science 1
1 hour
A 1-credit course. This course is an introduction laboratory techniques which will aide in the explanation of physics, chemistry, earth science, and space science, by some of the brightest minds on the planet. This lab course will teach the student how to use theory to problem-solve via hands on experiments and “think like a physical scientist” (e.g. quantitative reasoning and analysis).
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Natural Sciences.)
Prerequisites: Must be concurrently enrolled in SCIE 102.
Laboratory Fee: See current fee schedule.



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