Readers, Writers, Thinkers, and Dreamers Wanted

The English, Writing, and Professional Communications Program seeks to develop in students a mastery of the English language and an appreciation of its literatures so that they might work in a viable profession, live a meaningful life, and serve both the community and the cause of social justice. The program serves the College's General Education Program by providing both foundational and elective courses in literature and writing. Finally, through a variety of student publications, clubs, and special events, the program creates a vibrant community for literature and the arts both on the College's campus and in the surrounding community.

  • Mission Statement
  • Writing Program
  • Student Awards
  • Faculty
  • Summer Reading Program
  • Contact Us
  • Careers

The English, Writing, and Professional Communications program develops in students a mastery of the English language, an appreciation of its literatures, and the technical skills to work in modern communications. Built around a core of writing courses, the program teaches students to communicate with clarity, purpose, and style. It prepares students to work in a variety of 21st -century communication careers, pursue a viable writing profession, live a meaningful life, and serve their community. By providing both foundational and elective courses in literature and writing, the program also serves the College's General Education Program. Finally, through a variety of student publications, clubs, and special events, the EWPC program creates a vibrant community for literature, writing, and communication both on campus and in the community.

The English, Writing, and Professional Communications program offers an Associate of Arts degree and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. The Bachelor of Arts degree in English includes concentrations in Literature, Creative Writing, and Communications. In a set of core writing classes, students master the fundamentals of clear English composition, revision, and editing, then practice and apply these skills across a curriculum founded on experiential learning projects. Depending on the concentration, students then specialize in literary analysis, creative writing, or digital communications. All three degree concentrations ground students in the writing and reading skills necessary to pursue careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, advertising, public relations, social media, and technical writing. The Bachelor of Arts degree in English is also a strong undergraduate degree for those pursuing graduate studies in English, a career in teaching, or entrance into law school and a variety of other graduate programs.

Mission Statement

Writing classes at CCSJ introduce students to the skills necessary to participate in vitally important academic and public issues. A student's ability to write--that is, to conceptualize, articulate, compose, and craft a response or an argument--is key to a successful undergraduate education. Both of the required writing courses are designed to help students become life-long readers and writers who can think critically and solve problems using language. Writing courses at CCSJ emphasize the ability to write clearly and correctly and to read thoughtfully toward a broader understanding of the world.


Requirements for Students

Students at CCSJ are required to pass both courses in a two-semester cycle of first-year-writing courses, English 103 and English 104. Participation in preparatory courses is required for students whose placement tests indicate they would benefit from additional, focused writing and reading practice before taking English 103. The preparatory courses include English 093, which focuses on the needs of nonnative speakers of English, and English 095 and 096, which focus on the needs of native speakers of English. These preparatory courses feature smaller class sizes than English 103 and 104 and focus on fundamentals of academic reading and writing.
English 103 features a consequential portfolio that is evaluated by a committee of CCSJ professors using the CCSJ General Education Rubric for Writing Across the Curriculum. Students must pass this portfolio process to move on to English 104, even if they are otherwise in good standing in English 103. Students who do not pass the portfolio must take English 100.


Courses in the CCSJ Writing Sequence

EWPC 093 Developmental English for Non-Native Speakers
3 hours
This writing course prepares the student for college-level English by teaching the composition of grammatically correct sentences, well-organized paragraphs and longer papers, while focusing on the syntactical, grammatical and mechanical issues (e.g., prepositions, verbal phrases) common for ESL students. At the end of the course, the instructor will recommend the student registers for ENGL 095, 096, or 103. Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 095 Fundamentals of English I
3 hours
English 095 is the first course in the remedial writing sequence. It introduces the reading, writing, and technical concepts needed to comprehend and summarize college-level texts. The course provides students with the fundamentals of English grammar necessary to create effective sentences and cogent paragraphs. Grammar and mechanics will be reinforced both by responding in writing to classic and contemporary essays and by working through targeted exercises in the college's educational software. Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 096 Fundamentals of English II
3 hours
English 096 is the second course in the remedial writing sequence. It further develops the reading, writing, and technical concepts and skills students need to comprehend and summarize college-level texts. The course resolves the sentence-level errors and weaknesses in paragraph unity, development, and coherence addressed in English 095. Student reading and writing skills are brought to adequate college-level to responding in writing to more complex and difficult classic and contemporary essays and by working through additional targeted exercises in the college's educational software. Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 100 Fundamentals of English III
3 hours
This is a remedial course in English Composition for students who have taken and failed to successfully complete the portfolio assessment. Students will receive one-on-one assistance to help meet the portfolio requirements, learning to correct common grammatical and usage errors, solve common problems in sentence composition, organize paragraphs, construct essays, and shape their writing according to audience and purpose. To pass English 100 and move on to English 104, students must pass the college writing portfolio exam.
Prerequisite: Only students who have taken EWPC 103 and submitted a failing portfolio are eligible for this course.

EWPC 103 English Composition
3 hours
In this course students learn the concepts and skills needed to write an effective, college-level expository essay. Through both traditional and workshop methods, students gain greater control over the writing process, essay organization, paragraph construction, and sentence grammar. The course introduces students to the active reading and summary writing skills needed in English 104. Before successfully completing the course, students must demonstrate basic competency in a portfolio of semester writing.

EWPC 104. Academic Reading and Writing
3 hours
This course teaches students the concepts and skills needed to read and write with sources. Students learn how to find, read, summarize, and respond to a variety of college level texts. It teaches students print and electronic search techniques, analytic and synthetic reading skills, and the conventions of academic argument, culminating in ten pages of source-based writing.
Prerequisite: ENGL 103

The Geraldine Martin English Award

This award is presented annually to the outstanding graduating English major. Named for Dr. Geraldine Martin, who taught at CCSJ for over 30 years and was head of the English Program for 20, it recognizes students who have demonstrated their passion about literature and writing throughout their time at the College. Recent winners include:

2016 - Adam Webb
2015 - Amanda Blackwell
2014 - David Lund
2013 - Mary Zielinski
2012 - Shelley Lohr
2011 - Angela Hughes
2010 - Amy Hughes


The CCSJ Drama Award

This award is presented annually by the English Department to the graduating student who has consistently contributed to the Drama Department by performing and supporting plays and programs. These outstanding honorees include

2015 - Carlos Mota
2013 - Amada Moore
2012 - Charlie Davis
2011 - Shelley Lohr


The Ed Zivich Award

English students are also consistently nominated for College-wide recognition such as the Ed Zivich Award, which is awarded by the faculty as a whole to recognize students who are not only excellent students but who also contribute to the College community. English majors who have won this prestigious award include

2011 - Mittle Allen
2010 - Amy Hughes

Chris Buczinsky, Ph.D.
Chris Buczinsky, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English
Room 177
(219) 473-4250
cbuczinsky@ccsj.edu

Chris Buczinsky earned his Ph.D. in English from Northwestern University. A children’s poet, illustrator, and performer, Dr. Buczinsky wrote, illustrated, and self-published Pied Poetry, a collection of poems and pictures for children. As a co-founder of A Child’s Voice, he has performed and taught poetry and illustrator workshops to elementary students throughout the Chicagoland area. He has been assistant editor of The Wholesaler and The Plumbing and Heating Contractor News, two national trade magazines as well as a columnist for The Arlington Post in Arlington Heights, Illinois. He teaches American Literature, 20th Century Poetry, Literary Criticism and Theory. He is currently at work on a variety of children’s picture and poetry books. Dr. Buczinsky keeps a children’s poetry and illustration blog at www.chrisbuczinsky.com.



Kirk Robinson, M.F.A.
Kirk Robinson, M.F.A.

Associate Professor of English & English Program Director
Room 176
(219) 473-4308
krobinson@ccsj.edu

Kirk Robinson received his MFA in creative writing from The Ohio State University in 1998 and his B.A. from Webster University in 1993. He taught for seven years at the University of Illinois at Chicago and served as an assistant director of their First Year Writing Program. His poems have been published in several nationally distributed literary magazines, including Poetry Northwest, The American Literary Review, Third Coast, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. His poem "The Design of To-Morrow" has been selected and republished by Poetry Daily and his poem "A Motif" has been selected by Educational Testing Services for use on the reading comprehension section of their standardized tests. He teaches Rhetoric and Composition, 20th Century Poetry, Creative Writing, and a variety of liberal arts courses.



Mark Cassello, M.A.
Mark Cassello, M.A.

Assistant Professor of English
Room 180
(219) 473-4322
mcassello@ccsj.edu

Mark Cassello received his MA in American Literature and American Studies from Indiana University, Bloomington where he is currently completing his Ph.D. His research explores the rise of Chicago's social realist fiction that gains prominence between 1935 and 1950. He examines how late nineteenth century literature depicting the struggle between labor and capital informs the emergence of radical fiction within an extant local, literary tradition. He is a contributor to The Huffington Post a regular guest on the nationally syndicated political radio show Beyond the Beltway with Bruce DuMont, and is active in the historic preservation of the Pullman National Monument. He currently oversees the Communications Concentration within the English program and teaches a variety of courses in English, Rhetoric and Composition, and Communications.



Faculty

Christopher Buczinsky, Ph.D.; Mark Cassello, M.A.; Kirk Robinson, M.F.A.; Ginger Rodriguez, Ph.D.; Jennifer Young, M.A.


Adjunct Instructors

Niki Avina, M.E.; ; Ben Creech, M.A.; Carlye Frank, M.F.A.; Jason Garnett, M.A.; Dado Gyure, M.F.A.; Nita Meola, M.F.A.; Tony Lindsay, M.F.A.; Michael McGehee, M.A.; Linda Oldenburg, M.A.; Michael Ossman, M.A.; Michael Puente, B.A.; Laneah Ravn, M.A.

The CCSJ Summer Reading Program

(a) Set your goal for summer reading. Five books? Ten?
(b) Share your goal in CCSJ's Wavelength group on Facebook.
(c) Pick up reading lists in the English department, get recommendations from faculty--any faculty--or develop a reading list of your own.


Chris Buczinsky, Ph.D.

My Summer Reading List:

  1. Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
  2. Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne
  3. Black Lamb, Grey Falcon by Rebecca West
  4. The World of Bruegel by Timothy Foote
  5. Pastoralia by George Saunders

Recommended List:

  1. The Erotic Mind by Jack Morin
  2. The Wall Street Journal Complete Personal Finance Guidebook by Jeff Opdyke
  3. Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
  4. Dear Theo: The Autobiography of Vincent Van Gogh by Irving Stone
  5. The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World by Lewis Hyde

Ginger G. Rodriguez, Ph.D.

My Summer Reading List:

  1. On Literature by Umberto Eco
  2. Richard II, Henry IV, and Henry V by William Shakespeare
  3. Theory of the Novel: A Historical Approach by Michael McKeon, ed.
  4. Margaret Fuller: A New American Life by Megan Marshall
  5. The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition by M.R. Abrams

Recommended List:

  1. The Penelopiad, a contemporary updating of the Odyssey, told from the perspective of the stay-at-home Penelope, by Margaret Atwood
  2. Cold Mountain, another re-visioning of the Odyssey, this one set in the Civil War by Charles Frazier
  3. For Whom the Bell Tolls, a classic about love and war in Spain by Ernet Hemingway
  4. The Mask of Apollo and The Last of the Wine, historical novels that my freshman history teacher recommended long ago (that I've loved) and that help readers envision ancient Greece, by Mary Renault
  5. The Alexander Trilogy by Mary Renault

Kirk Robinson, M.F.A.

My Summer Reading List:

  1. Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display by Steven D. Lavine
  2. Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner
  3. Why Art Cannot Be Taught by James Elkins
  4. Madness, Rack and Honey: Collected Lectures by Mary Ruefle
  5. Bunch of Amateurs: A Search for the American Character by Jack Hitt

Recommended List:

  1. The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
  2. The Lost City of Z by David Grann
  3. Ariel by Sylvia Plath
  4. The Liar's Club by Mary Karr
  5. What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

Mark Cassello, M.A.

My Summer Reading List:

  1. Antony and Cleopatra by Shakespeare
  2. Field Notes on Democracy by Arundhati Roy
  3. Man of the Hour by Octave Thanet
  4. Mapping Ideology by Slavoj Zizek
  5. Ask the Dust by John Fante

Recommended List:

  1. Devil in the White City by Erik Larsen
  2. The Big Sea by Langston Hughes
  3. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
  4. Rules for Radicals by Saul Alinsky
  5. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Contact the Department of English

Calumet College of St. Joseph
Department of English, Writing, and Professional Communications
c/o Dr. Christopher Buczinsky
2400 New York Avenue
Whiting, IN 46394

Find the English faculty in rooms 180, 179, 177, and 176.

Telephone: (219) 473-4250
Fax: (219) 473-4259
Email: cbuczinsky@ccsj.edu



Thank you for your interest in the Department of English, Writing, and Professional Communications. We'd love to hear from you.

What English Majors Do for a Living

Some fields, such as nursing, provide students with a ready-made job upon graduation. By contrast, English Majors design their own job. They forge a personalized career path by determining their goals and then developing their skill set to achieve these goals.
For example, English Majors who would like to work in digital media must also have a solid technical background in graphic design and computer programming languages. Students who wish to become professors of English need to pursue a graduate degree and become skilled in academic research.
There are literally dozens of potential career paths for English Majors, but it is up to each individual to establish clear career goals and to seek the additional skills necessary to achieve these goals. Here is a list of some of the career possibilities available to English Majors:

Writing
Journalist, Novelist, Poet, Essayist, Speech Writer, Ghostwriter, Screen Writer, Periodical Writer, Technical Writer, Grant Writer, Blogger, TV/Radio Writer

Marketing
Marketing Communications Manager, Publicist/Public Relations, Fundraiser

Editing
Magazine (Trade and Consumer) Editor, Literary Journal Editor, Web Content Editor

Teaching/Tutoring
High School English Teacher, ESL Teacher, English Professor (Literature, Creative Writing, Rhetoric and Composition or English Education), Tutor

Publishing
Literary Agent, Book Editor

Advertising
Copywriter for Print, Direct Mail, TV, Radio, Internet, Social Media

Law
Paralegal/Legal Assistant, Lawyer

Others
Librarian, Researcher, Politician





Take the next step!



Program Requirements


  • B.A. - Literature
  • B.A. - Creative Writing
  • B.A. - Communications
  • A.A. - English
  • Minor in English
  • Courses

B.A. in English with a Literature Concentration (120 hours)

All students in the major share a common core of literature and writing courses, but the program allows students to concentrate in one of three areas:

  • The B.A. in English with a Literature Concentration, which focuses on literature and the intellectual skills of reading and understanding literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Creative Writing Concentration, which focuses upon writing and the creation of literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Communications Concentration, which focuses on writing for business, media, and other professional contexts.
  1. 38 hours: General Education

  2. 12 hours: English Program Shared Writing Core
    EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
    EWPC 320 History and Study of the English Language
    EWPC 325 The Literary Essay
    EWPC 410 Editing

  3. 9 hours: Requisites for the Concentration
    EWPC 255 Foundations of Western Literature
    EWPC 265 British Literature
    EWPC 275 American Literature

  4. 24 hours: Upper Level Courses in the Major
    EWPC 310 Shakespeare
    EWPC 499 Senior Seminar

    Three of the following five:

    • EWPC 373 American Cinema
    • EWPC 440 20th Century Poetry
    • EWPC 445 Literary Criticism
    • EWPC 450 The Novel
    • EWPC 460 The Drama

    Three upper-level courses in English


  5. 37 hours: Electives

Note: All students must receive a 3.0 or higher GPA in their upper-level major courses to be eligible to receive a degree in English, Writing, and Professional Communications.

B.A. in English with a Creative Writing Concentration (120 hours)

All students in the major share a common core of literature and writing courses, but the program allows students to concentrate in one of three areas:

  • The B.A. in English with a Literature Concentration, which focuses on literature and the intellectual skills of reading and understanding literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Creative Writing Concentration, which focuses upon writing and the creation of literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Communications Concentration, which focuses on writing for business, media, and other professional contexts.

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree with a Creative Writing Concentration:

  1. 38 hours: General Education

  2. 12 hours: English Program Shared Writing Core
    EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
    EWPC 320 History and Study of the English Language
    EWPC 325 The Literary Essay
    EWPC 410 Editing

  3. 12 hours: Requisites for the Concentration
    EWPC 235 Introduction to Creative Writing
    EWPC 255 Foundations of Western Literature
    EWPC 265 British Literature
    EWPC 275 American Literature

  4. 21 hours: Upper Level Courses in the Major
    EWPC 310 Shakespeare
    EWPC 435 Advanced Creative Writing
    EWPC 499 Senior Seminar

    Two of the following five*:

    • EWPC 373 American Cinema
    • EWPC 440 20th Century Poetry
    • EWPC 445 Literary Criticism
    • EWPC 450 The Novel
    • EWPC 460 The Drama

    Two upper-level courses in English


  5. 37 hours: Electives

Note: All students must receive a 3.0 or higher GPA in their upper-level major courses to be eligible to receive an English degree.

B.A. in English with a Communications Concentration (120 hours)

All students in the major share a common core of literature and writing courses, but the program allows students to concentrate in one of three areas:

  • The B.A. in English with a Literature Concentration, which focuses on literature and the intellectual skills of reading and understanding literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Creative Writing Concentration, which focuses upon writing and the creation of literary and other texts.
  • The B.A. in English with a Communications Concentration, which focuses on writing for business, media, and other professional contexts.

The following courses are required for a baccalaureate degree with a Communications Concentration:

  1. 38 hours: General Education

  2. 12 hours: English Program Shared Writing Core
    EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
    EWPC 320 History and Study of the English Language
    EWPC 325 The Literary Essay
    EWPC 410 Editing

  3. 15 hours: Requisites for the Concentration
    EWPC 115 Introduction to Mass Communications
    EWPC 316 Reporting and Writing for the Media
    EWPC 355 Multimedia Computer Graphics (cross-listed ARTS 355)
    EWPC 370 Video Production I
    EWPC 372 Audio Production

  4. 24 hours: Upper Level Courses in the Major
    EWPC 420 Ethics and Law in Print, Broadcast, and Web Media
    EWPC 470 Applied Journalism I
    EWPC 471 Applied Journalism II
    EWPC 480 Applied Media I
    EWPC 481 Applied Media II
    EWPC 499 Senior Seminar

    Two upper-level courses in English


  5. 31 hours: Electives

Note: All students must receive a 3.0 or higher GPA in their upper-level major courses to be eligible to receive a degree in English, Writing, and Professional Communications.

A.A. in English (59 hours)

The following courses are required for the associate degree:

  • 35 hours: General Education

  • 12 hours: Requisites for the Major
    EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
    EWPC 255 Foundations of Western Literature
    EWPC 265 British Literature or ENGL 275 American Literature
    EWPC 235 Intro to Creative Writing

  • 6 hours: Upper Level Courses in Major
    EWPC 310 Shakespeare
    EWPC 320 History and Study of the English Language

  • 6 hours: Two English Electives at level-200 or above

Note: All students must receive a 3.0 or higher GPA in their upper-level major courses to be eligible to receive a degree in English, Writing, and Professional Communications.

Minor in English (18 hours)

Why Consider an English Minor?
The ability to think critically and write well is a skill needed in every professional career. In addition, advances in technology have made it a necessity for businesses and organizations to communicate with their employees and the public in new ways that require writing. Employers need people to create content for their Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, blogs, and other marketing materials. This is in addition to all of the other writing--reports, emails, presentations, newsletters--that employees traditionally do. All of this makes an English Minor a very marketable asset for any college graduate.
An English Minor can help you get a job in any of these fields: business, law, criminal justice, education, psychology, social work, politics, public relations, advertising, journalism, communications, publishing, nursing, media, information technology, and more.


Minor in English (18 hours)

The following courses are required for an English Minor:

  • EWPC 235 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
  • EWPC 255 Foundations of Western Literature
  • EWPC 265 British Literature or EWPC 275 American Literature
  • EWPC 320 History and Study of the English Language
  • One English Elective 200 or above

Minor in Drama (18 hours)

The following courses and co-curricular activities are required:

  • EWPC 240 Performance and Stagecraft (6 hours)
  • EWPC 310 Shakespeare (with permission of program director)
  • EWPC 460 The Drama (with permission of program director)
  • Six hours of related work in English or ARTS (with permission of the program director)

EWPC 093 Developmental English for Non-Native Speakers
3 hours
This writing course prepares the student for college-level English by teaching the composition of grammatically correct sentences, well-organized paragraphs and longer papers, while focusing on the syntactical, grammatical and mechanical issues (e.g., prepositions, verbal phrases) common for ESL students. At the end of the course, the instructor and program director will advise the student toward the next appropriate EWPC course.
Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 095 Fundamentals of English I
3 hours
English 095 is the first course in the remedial writing sequence. It introduces the reading, writing, and technical concepts needed to comprehend and summarize college-level texts. The course provides students with the fundamentals of English grammar necessary to create effective sentences and cogent paragraphs. Grammar and mechanics will be reinforced both by responding in writing to classic and contemporary essays and by working through targeted exercises in the college’s educational software.
Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 096 Fundamentals of English II
3 hours
English 096 is the second course in the remedial writing sequence. It further develops the reading, writing, and technical concepts and skills students need to comprehend and summarize college-level texts. The course resolves the sentence-level errors and weaknesses in paragraph unity, development, and coherence addressed in English 095. Student reading and writing skills are brought to adequate college-level by responding in writing to more complex and difficult classic and contemporary essays and by working through additional targeted exercises in the college’s educational software.
Not applicable toward a degree.

EWPC 100 Fundamentals of English III
3 hours
This is a remedial course in English Composition for students who have taken and failed to successfully complete the portfolio assessment. Students will receive one-on-one assistance to help meet the portfolio requirements, learning to correct common grammatical and usage errors, solve common problems in sentence composition, organize paragraphs, construct essays, and shape their writing according to audience and purpose. To pass English 100 and move on to English 104, students must pass the college writing portfolio exam.
Prerequisite: Only students who have taken EWPC 103 and submitted a failing portfolio are eligible for this course.

EWPC 103  English Composition
3 hours
In this course students learn the concepts and skills needed to write an effective, college-level expository essay. Through both traditional and workshop methods, students gain greater control over the writing process, essay organization, paragraph construction, and sentence grammar. Before successfully completing the course, students must demonstrate basic competency in a portfolio of semester writing.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education requirement.)

EWPC 111  The Literary Experience
3 hours
Using classic and contemporary short stories and poems, this course introduces students to the elements of fiction and poetry and to the interpretive skills necessary to deepen their experience of great literature. Students study both Western literary classics and minority challenges to that tradition, examining the role of stories and poems in a meaningful life.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Humanities.)
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 112  Honors Literary Experience
3 hours
Using classic and contemporary short stories and poems, this course introduces students to the elements of fiction and poetry and to the interpretive skills necessary to deepen their experience of great literature. Students study both Western literary classics and minority challenges to that tradition, examining the role of stories and poems in a meaningful life.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education option in Humanities.)
Prerequisites: EWPC 103 and admission into the St. Gaspar's Honors Learning Community.

EWPC 115  Introduction to Mass Communications
3 hours
This course gives students an increased understanding of the roles media play in the ongoing development of culture and society and a broad foundation in the issues, impact, and behind-thescenes processes of communication media, such as books, magazines, newspapers, radio, television, film, public relations, advertising and the Internet.

EWPC 150 Public Speaking
3 hours
This course helps develop the students' ability to speak confidently and effectively in a variety of public speaking situations. Students will learn and employ elements of classical rhetoric while preparing and presenting several different types of speeches utilizing a variety of media. Particular attention is paid to balancing adequate content with effective delivery.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education requirement.)

EWPC 204. Academic Reading and Writing II
3 hours
This course, part of the General Education Capstone, helps students refine concepts and skills needed to read and write with sources, and requires students to utilize their general education knowledge in a synthetic, analytic summative writing project in accordance with the college’s mission. This course utilizes concepts and skills from the general education program, and teaches students the concepts and skills needed to read and write utilizing academic sources. Students learn how to find, read, summarize, and respond to a variety of college level texts in a variety of genres. It teaches students academic print and electronic search techniques, analytic and synthetic reading skills, and the conventions of academic argument, culminating in ten pages of source-based writing. Students must pass a competency portfolio to be eligible for the second part of the General Education Capstone.
(This course is a CCSJ General Education requirement.)
Prerequisites: EWPC 103 and completion of or enrollment in all introductory and intermediate general education courses, or permission of general education program director.

EWPC 235 Introduction to Creative Writing
3 hours
This process-based workshop introduces students to the fundamentals of good writing in a variety of genres, including non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and drama. Students explore the fundamentals of plotting, controlling point of view, creating characters, managing sound and voice, and developing a concrete, active literary style. The course emphasizes the connections between active reading, composing, and substantial, creative revision. Students will critically analyze (and respond to) professional and student writing.
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 240 Performance and Stagecraft
3 hours
Students participate in various elements (acting, production staff) of one or more theater productions at CCSJ. This course may be taken twice for up to six credit hours.
Cross-listed with ARTS 240.

EWPC 250 Introduction to Textual Studies
3 hours
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of textual study and initiates students into the art of reading texts of all kinds, from traditional poems, stories, and essays to video commercials, films, and TV dramas. Through close reading and the use of a variety of critical lenses, the course teaches students the fundamentals of reading cultural texts with insight and the craft of writing about them with grace and style.
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 255 Foundations of Western Literature
3 hours
This course introduces students to key narratives in the Western literary tradition, providing them with the background knowledge needed to understand and appreciate American, English, and European literature. Students read a selection of Greek and Roman epic and myth, Biblical and religious stories central to the Judeo-Christian tradition, medieval romance and satire, Shakespearean drama, and modern myths from Faust to Frankenstein.
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 265 British Literature
3 hours
This course traces the development of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the twentieth century. It explores the major writers, works and literary movements in fiction and poetry, providing students with an appreciation of Great Britain’s rich literary heritage.
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 273 American Cinema
3 hours
This course presents an overview of the history of American film and selected genres. Students study classical Hollywood style, the star system, film techniques and language, the structure of the film industry, and social commentary. Students view films in connection with each unit of the Study Guide and experience a live play for media comparison.
Cross-listed with ARTS 373.

EWPC 275 American Literature
3 hours
This course surveys American literature from the colonial era through the twentieth century. It explores the major literary movements, writers, and works in fiction and poetry and provides students with an appreciation for America’s rich literary heritage.
Prerequisite: EWPC 103

EWPC 310 Shakespeare
3 hours
This course examines the principal plays of Shakespeare. It engages students in his timeless characters, his riveting plots, and his universal human themes. It introduces students to his principal dramatic genres (history, comedy, tragedy, and romance) and his extraordinary dramatic poetry and sonnets, and it investigates the historical and social contexts in which he wrote, placing emphasis on his innovations and influence in the realms of language, literature, and theater.
Prerequisite: EWPC 250

EWPC 316 Reporting and Writing for the Media
3 hours
This course teaches students the fundamentals of news reporting and writing for the various media. It concentrates on traditional computer-assisted research skills and the news and feature writing skills important across media platforms, stressing objective communication style. It also introduces students to the legal and ethical issues central to working in the media industry.
Prerequisites: EWPC 103

EWPC 320 The History and Study of the English Language
3 hours
This course traces the evolution and development of the English language from its IndoEuropean roots to today's regional and cultural vernaculars. It includes a close study of English etymology, of the interactions between language and technology (the invention of paper, the printing press, mass-market publishing, and the Internet), the evolution of our grammar and punctuation, and the controversies over the structural canons of the English language.

EWPC 325 The Literary Essay
3 hours
This is a course in advanced non-fiction composition beginning with a close reading of great English literary prose stylists. The course is built on a five-part foundation of grammar, rhetoric, style, structure, and meaningful beauty. It uses classic readings as prompts and models on which students produce short pieces of technically correct and sophisticated writing. The course involves intensive reading and writing and extensive feedback using a workshop model. Students develop a portfolio of revised and polished work and pass a sequence of grammar and sentence construction tests.
Prerequisites: EWPC 103

EWPC 355 Multimedia Computer Graphics
3 hours
Students explore computer-aided design media and various applications. Working with Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, students learn the fundamentals of multimedia development and presentation and complete a series of projects.

EWPC 370 Video Production I
3 hours
Students study the history of video as an art form and as a tool for effective communication. Students also gain experience in all practical aspects of studio/video pre-production, production, and post-production.
Cross-listed with ARTS 370

EWPC 372 Audio Production
3 hours
Students will learn the fundamentals of audio production and put these skills to use by creating original audio content to be streamed online. They will learn basic audio terminology, the history of audio production, and the technical skills needed to create and post online audio content. Students will apply their knowledge of critical listening, acoustic principles, and microphone usage and placement to record and edit multi-track audio.

EWPC 405 Children’s Literature
3 hours
This is a survey of traditional and contemporary literature for children from kindergarten through junior high school. Students explore the history of children’s literature, the basic types of children’s literature, the major authors and illustrators in the history of children’s literature, and various methods for their classroom use.
Field experiences are required. Cross-listed: EDU 400

EWPC 410 Editing
3 hours
This course introduces students to the principles and practical applications of copy marking, copyediting, and comprehensive editing. Students will work with professional writing from several fields: technology, business, and science, as well as literary texts and texts intended for academic publication. The course is focused on practical, skill-building exercises and assignments in editing. Students gain hands-on experience working on publications at CCSJ, including brochures, Web-based texts, and the student literary magazine, Against the Grain.
Prerequisite: EWPC 250, EWPC 320, and EWPC 325.

EWPC 420 Ethics and Law in Print and Broadcast Media
3 hours
This course examines the study and research of legal and ethical problems involved in print, broadcast, and Web media, including libel, privacy, court systems and cases, copyright laws, obscenity and pornography, freedom of press, and FCC regulations. In addition, students will analyze contemporary media ethics and principles.
Prerequisite: EWPC 316

EWPC 435 Advanced Creative Writing
3 hours
This course builds on skills from the introductory Creative Writing course and prepares students for work as advanced critical readers and published writers. The course requires students to master fundamental literary moves in multiple genres and allows students to investigate areas of interest in Creative Writing, including writing for the Internet, writing for children, genre writing, playwriting, television, and script writing.
Students may take this course two (2) times for up to 6 hours of credit.
Prerequisite: EWPC 235 or permission of instructor

EWPC 440 20th Century Poetry
3 hours
This course introduces students to poetry from the dawn of Modernism to the present. The course surveys the important writers, works, and movements in British, American, and global Anglo poetry. It explores the tensions between fixed and organic forms, the nature of modernist and post-modernist poetry, and the way in which poetics guides and influences poetry writing.
Prerequisites: EWPC 250 and 255

EWPC 445. Literary Theory and Criticism
3 hours
This is a course of study in reading and writing about poetry and stories. It is both a practical, skills-oriented course in the art of writing about literature and a theoretical, content-oriented course in the history of literary criticism and theory. Students read, analyze, and interpret literature while being introduced to the classic statements of literary criticism and theory from the Greeks to the present.
Prerequisites: EWPC 250. In addition, EWPC 255 and 325 are recommended.

EWPC 450 The Novel
3 hours
This course introduces students to the novel, the premier literary genre of the industrial and modern world. It traces the development of the novel from its origins in 18th century England, through the rise of realism in the 19th century, and into the various experiments with the novel form in 20th century modernism and post-modernism.
Prerequisites: EWPC 250 and 255

EWPC 460 The Drama
3 hours
This course surveys the development of the theater arts during the major periods of the theater, from Ancient Greece to modern times. It explores the genre both as form of writing and as a performance, surveys the masterpieces of world drama, the world’s great dramatists, and the most important dramatic movements in world drama.
Prerequisites: EWPC 250 and 255

EWPC 470 Applied Journalism
3 hours
This experiential learning course puts into practice the journalism skills learned in Reporting and Writing for the Media. Students will serve on the staff of The Shavings student newspaper and be intimately involved in its production and publication.
Prerequisites: EWPC 316

EWPC 471 Applied Media
3 hours
This experiential learning course puts into practice all of the professional writing and digital video/audio skills needed to do public-ready, Web-based journalism. Using multiple media platforms (text, audio, and visual), students will craft professional and compelling news and feature stories to share with a variety of internal and external audiences—students, alumni, prospective students, benefactors, and the local community. Students will assemble a portfolio of representative work that can be presented to prospective employers.
Prerequisites: EWPC 370, and EWPC 372

EWPC 480 Applied Journalism II
3 hours
This experiential learning course puts into practice the journalism skills learned in Reporting and Writing for the Media. Students will serve on the staff of The Shavings student newspaper and be intimately involved in its production and publication. Students will be required to conduct interviews, research, and write a feature length cover story, investigative piece, or profile that will be developed in close coordination with a faculty advisor. Students will assemble a final portfolio showcasing their best journalistic writing published in The Shavings.
Prerequisites: EWPC 470

EWPC 481 Applied Media II
3 hours
This project-based learning course puts into practice all of the professional writing and digital video/audio skills needed to do produce professional quality audio/visual content. Students will work on consequential media projects that will serve the College, a particular client, or the community. Using multiple media platforms (text, audio, and visual), students will craft professional and compelling audio and visual content to share with a variety of internal and external audiences. Students will assemble a final portfolio showcasing their best audio/visual content.
Prerequisites: EWPC 471

EWPC 495 Internship in English
1-3 hours
The internship in English enables students to acquire practical experience in a variety of professional writing settings that draw on the skills and knowledge obtained in their course of study. Work settings include publishers, small presses, public relations firms, ad agencies, magazines, newspapers, etc. The program director must approve and a full-time faculty member in English must coordinate the internship.
The course may be repeated for up to 6 hours.
Prerequisites: Senior status needed before application can be made.

EWPC 496 Topics in English
3 hours
Topics courses in this program will examine areas of special interest in the fields of English, writing, and communications. They will allow students and professors to explore such wideranging topics as The Graphic Novel, Horror Stories, Creating Podcasts, Studies in Contemporary Multicultural Literature, Sportswriting, Autobiography and Memoir, Detective Fiction, The Western, and more.
Topics courses (but not specific topics) may be repeated for a total of 9 hours.

EWPC 499 Senior Seminar in English
3 hours
In the Senior Seminar in English students prepare a large writing project designed in cooperation with his or her advisor, perform the variety of tasks necessary to enter the job market: doing industry research and job searches, writing resumes and cover-letters, and preparing writing portfolios. Students must pass the “Senior Survival Week” English Program Exam, which is the final assessment of all English majors.
Senior standing is required.




Join our English clubs





Other English Clubs & Publications


  • The Shavings
  • Literary Magazine
  • CCSJ Wavelength
  • The Stratford Experience
  • Writers@Work

The Shavings NewsletterThe Shavings is Calumet College of St. Joseph’s student-run online and print newspaper, the college community’s go-to source of news and opinion on issues that affect CCSJ’s students, faculty, and staff. Written, edited, and designed by CCSJ students, the fortunes of the paper have waxed and waned with the history of the college.

Originally called Stuff, the paper’s name was changed in 1961 to Shavings, in honor of St. Joseph, the worker, the college’s patron saint. The “shavings” of the name refers to the chips or leavings of a carpenter’s plane, an allusion to the tradition and standards of craftsmanship that has guided the paper’s production throughout its history.

The paper lived through in the early, pioneering days of the college, when the school opened its East Chicago Campus in 1960, and followed the college’s move to its present location at 2400 New York Avenue Whiting in January, 1976.

Sometimes weekly, sometimes monthly, the Shavings has seen a long line of student editors who have faithfully covered calamities (like the great snowstorm of January 26, 1967, when approximately forty students were stranded and spent several nights in the student lounge) and controversies (like the one sparked by the publication of an abortion ad in the early 70’s).

The mission of The Shavings is to report the college news in a balanced way, give students practice in the fields of journalism and newspaper design, and to provide a lively forum to help build a strong college community.

Editors

Editor: Felipe Espinosa
Layout Editor: Felipe Espinosa
Sports Editor: TBD


Staff

Aimee Perhach
Bronte Eather
Felix Rojas
Denzel Carroll
Jenny Deecken
Brian Contreras
Sebastian Caballero
Kyle Brown

Faculty Advisor: Mark Cassello


How to Join and Get Involved

Submissions - The Shavings editor invites any and all CCSJ students, faculty, and staff to submit news articles, feature stories, editorials, and letters to the editor for publication in The Shavings. The editor reserves the right to edit all submissions for length, style, and quality. Please submit your articles to mcassello@ccsj.edu.

Joining the Staff - All students are encouraged to join The Shavings staff. If you would like to become a regular staff writer, contact the faculty advisor at mcassello@ccsj.edu. The newspaper staff meets twice monthly, once to plan and once to review each monthly issue.

Against the Grain is a student driven literary magazine, featuring writing from a wide variety of student voices and backgrounds, as could be expected from the long-standing most diverse university in the midwest. The magazine began as Splinters in 1993 as a forum for student writing and evolved into Against the Grain in 2003, and has been published on a not-quite annual basis ever since. Each year the magazine has a faculty advisor, two student editors, and features art, photography and literature from the student community. In the 2013-2014 school year, the magazine will celebrate 20 years of student writing with a small "best of "anthology to be unveiled during the school's annual humanities festival.


Advisor

Kirk Robinson - krobinson@ccsj.edu


Now Accepting Submissions

We are always looking for talented new authors, artists, and photographers to share their work with Against the Grain. Submissions are now being accepted for the 2017 issue of CCSJ's literary magazine.
Click here to upload your submission.

CCSJ Wavelength (Facebook Group)

Facebook Group ImageAre Google search lists poetry? Does grammar matter? Are any movie adaptations as good as the book they're based on? What is everyone reading over the holiday break? Discussions on these topics are going on now on the English Department's Exclusive Facebook Home--Wavelength. You'll also find job opportunities for English majors; information about internships, conferences, and contests; announcements about department meetings; and invitations to parties there. If you read to "live several lives" (William Styron) or to "slip, involuntarily, often helplessly, into another's skin, another's voice, another's soul" (Joyce Carol Oates); if you, like Lemony Snicket, "Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them," then you belong on Wavelength too.

Contact any English professor to join.


The Stratford Experience

As part of Calumet College of St. Joseph's belief in the transformative power of experiential learning, each fall, students enrolled in EWPC 460, The Drama (a.k.a. The Stratford Experience), travel to Canada to see world-class theater at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. The Stratford Shakespeare Festival is an internationally recognized celebration of theater and North America's largest classical repertory theater. The festival promotes the works of William Shakespeare, but also includes works from canonical authors including Samuel Beckett, Arthur Miller, Bertolt Brecht, and many more. Recently, students attended productions of King Lear, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Beaux Strategem, and the lavish musical Crazy for You.

The course lasts approximately six weeks. During this time, students learn about the evolution of dramatic performance from Ancient Greece to the Post-Modern Era. They perform close readings of the plays they will see produced. They travel to Stratford and spend three to four days seeing plays, touring the facilities, and enjoying the idyllic beauty of the town. After the trip, students compile their reflections into a Stratford Journal and prepare a formal literary analysis essay examining one of the productions.

Writers@Work

Writers@Work is our visiting writers series, and is a presentation of the Liberal Arts Department and the CCSJ Creative Writing Club. Unlike some series, which present literary writers only, ours presents authors and speakers who represent a very broad view of what writing does in the world. We've had community leaders, oral historians and lawyers, as well as poets, playwrights and novelists.

Recent Visiting Writers include

  • National Poetry Slam Team Member Marty McConnell, ("wine for a shotgun"), October 22, 2012
  • Playwright and historian John Fraire, ("Who Will Dance With Pancho Villa?" and "Cesar Lives"), April 17, 2012
  • Indiana Poet Laureate Karen Kovacik, ("Metropolis Burning," "Nixon and I," and others), April 3, 2012
  • Def-Jam poet Kevin Coval, ("L-Vis Lives", "Everyday People"), April 21, 2011
  • Award winning novelist and fiction writer Bruce Machart, ("Men in the Making" and "The Wake of Forgiveness"), February 8, 2011
  • Oral historians Ray and Trish Arredondo, ("Maria's Journey)
  • Community Organizer Stephen Noble Smith ("Stoking the Fires of Democracy"), November 17, 2010





Contact our Enrollment Specialists



Carlos Moreno
Carlos Moreno

Jordan Thome
Jordan Thome

Ellen Wilson
Ellen Wilson